Sealy Center for Environmental Health Medicine

Organization profile

Organization profile

Director:  Cornelis J. Elferink, PhD  

Deputy Director:  Lawrence C. Sowers, PhD

 

The mission of the Sealy Center for Environmental Health Medicine, AKA UTMB Center in Environmental Toxicology (UTMB-CET) is to explore the environmental basis of human diseases by fostering collaborative interactions amongst multidisciplinary basic and clinical investigators pursuing both fundamental and translational research pertinent to the effects of environmental factors on human health. The UTMB-CET is housed at the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston, and is the only NIEHS environmental health center located on the Gulf of Mexico coast, near the nation's busiest shipping port (Port of Houston) and an expansive petrochemical refining and manufacturing infrastructure. Our proximity to sources of many significant environmental problems makes UTMB a compelling site for such an environmental health sciences center. The underlying causes of these problems include the composition of the natural environment, meteorological conditions (namely hurricanes), population density, personal and commercial transportation patterns, and the endemic petrochemical industry. Some of the most serious environmental issues are ozone pollution, emissions of fine particulates, hazardous chemical releases, hazardous waste sites, and PCB/dioxin contamination of the marine biota. The UTMB-CET investigators concentrate their efforts in three disease categories: 1) asthma pathogenesis; 2) environmentally-linked carcinogenesis; and 3) disease states induced by reactive oxygen stress.

Organization profile

Director:  Cornelis J. Elferink, PhD  

Deputy Director:  Lawrence C. Sowers, PhD

 

The mission of the Sealy Center for Environmental Health Medicine, AKA UTMB Center in Environmental Toxicology (UTMB-CET) is to explore the environmental basis of human diseases by fostering collaborative interactions amongst multidisciplinary basic and clinical investigators pursuing both fundamental and translational research pertinent to the effects of environmental factors on human health. The UTMB-CET is housed at the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston, and is the only NIEHS environmental health center located on the Gulf of Mexico coast, near the nation's busiest shipping port (Port of Houston) and an expansive petrochemical refining and manufacturing infrastructure. Our proximity to sources of many significant environmental problems makes UTMB a compelling site for such an environmental health sciences center. The underlying causes of these problems include the composition of the natural environment, meteorological conditions (namely hurricanes), population density, personal and commercial transportation patterns, and the endemic petrochemical industry. Some of the most serious environmental issues are ozone pollution, emissions of fine particulates, hazardous chemical releases, hazardous waste sites, and PCB/dioxin contamination of the marine biota. The UTMB-CET investigators concentrate their efforts in three disease categories: 1) asthma pathogenesis; 2) environmentally-linked carcinogenesis; and 3) disease states induced by reactive oxygen stress.

Fingerprint The fingerprint is based on mining the text of the scientific documents related to the associated persons. Based on that an index of weighted terms is created, which defines the key subjects of research unit

Asthma Medicine & Life Sciences
Inflammation Medicine & Life Sciences
Hydrogen Sulfide Medicine & Life Sciences
Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons Medicine & Life Sciences
Petroleum Pollution Medicine & Life Sciences
Gene Expression Medicine & Life Sciences
Proteins Medicine & Life Sciences
DNA Glycosylases Medicine & Life Sciences

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Research Output 2003 2019

  • 573 Citations
  • 12 h-Index
  • 88 Article
  • 8 Review article
  • 2 Letter
  • 1 Short survey
Cystathionine
Lyases
Virus Diseases
Smoke
Tobacco
3 Citations (Scopus)

Efficacy of novel highly specific bromodomain-containing protein 4 inhibitors in innate inflammation–driven airway remodeling

Tian, B., Liu, Z., Litvinov, J., Maroto, R., Jamaluddin, M., Rytting, E., Patrikeev, I., Ochoa, L., Vargas, G., Motamedi, M., Ameredes, B., Zhou, J. & Brasier, A. R., Jan 1 2019, In : American Journal of Respiratory Cell and Molecular Biology. 60, 1, p. 68-83 16 p.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Airway Remodeling
Toll-Like Receptor 3
Histone Acetyltransferases
Myofibroblasts
Proteins

Exercise and probiotics attenuate the development of Alzheimer's disease in transgenic mice: Role of microbiome

Abraham, D., Feher, J., Scuderi, G. L., Szabo, D., Dobolyi, A., Cservenak, M., Juhasz, J., Ligeti, B., Pongor, S., Gomez-Cabrera, M. C., Vina, J., Higuchi, M., Suzuki, K., Boldogh, I. & Radak, Z., Jan 1 2019, In : Experimental Gerontology. 115, p. 122-131 10 p.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Microbiota
Probiotics
Transgenic Mice
Alzheimer Disease
Amyloid