2015 proceedings of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute's State of the Science in Transfusion Medicine symposium

State of the Science in Transfusion Medicine Working Groups

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

On March 25 and 26, 2015, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute sponsored a meeting on the State of the Science in Transfusion Medicine on the National Institutes of Health (NIH) campus in Bethesda, Maryland, which was attended by a diverse group of 330 registrants. The meeting's goal was to identify important research questions that could be answered in the next 5 to 10 years and which would have the potential to transform the clinical practice of transfusion medicine. These questions could be addressed by basic, translational, and/or clinical research studies and were focused on four areas: the three "classical" transfusion products (i.e., red blood cells, platelets, and plasma) and blood donor issues. Before the meeting, four working groups, one for each area, prepared five major questions for discussion along with a list of five to 10 additional questions for consideration. At the meeting itself, all of these questions, and others, were discussed in keynote lectures, small-group breakout sessions, and large-group sessions with open discourse involving all meeting attendees. In addition to the final lists of questions, provided herein, the meeting attendees identified multiple overarching, cross-cutting themes that addressed issues common to all four areas; the latter are also provided. It is anticipated that addressing these scientific priorities, with careful attention to the overarching themes, will inform funding priorities developed by the NIH and provide a solid research platform for transforming the future practice of transfusion medicine.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2282-2290
Number of pages9
JournalTransfusion
Volume55
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2015
Externally publishedYes

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National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (U.S.)
Transfusion Medicine
National Institutes of Health (U.S.)
Research
Blood Donors
Blood Platelets
Erythrocytes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology
  • Hematology

Cite this

2015 proceedings of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute's State of the Science in Transfusion Medicine symposium. / State of the Science in Transfusion Medicine Working Groups.

In: Transfusion, Vol. 55, No. 9, 01.09.2015, p. 2282-2290.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

State of the Science in Transfusion Medicine Working Groups. / 2015 proceedings of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute's State of the Science in Transfusion Medicine symposium. In: Transfusion. 2015 ; Vol. 55, No. 9. pp. 2282-2290.
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abstract = "On March 25 and 26, 2015, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute sponsored a meeting on the State of the Science in Transfusion Medicine on the National Institutes of Health (NIH) campus in Bethesda, Maryland, which was attended by a diverse group of 330 registrants. The meeting's goal was to identify important research questions that could be answered in the next 5 to 10 years and which would have the potential to transform the clinical practice of transfusion medicine. These questions could be addressed by basic, translational, and/or clinical research studies and were focused on four areas: the three {"}classical{"} transfusion products (i.e., red blood cells, platelets, and plasma) and blood donor issues. Before the meeting, four working groups, one for each area, prepared five major questions for discussion along with a list of five to 10 additional questions for consideration. At the meeting itself, all of these questions, and others, were discussed in keynote lectures, small-group breakout sessions, and large-group sessions with open discourse involving all meeting attendees. In addition to the final lists of questions, provided herein, the meeting attendees identified multiple overarching, cross-cutting themes that addressed issues common to all four areas; the latter are also provided. It is anticipated that addressing these scientific priorities, with careful attention to the overarching themes, will inform funding priorities developed by the NIH and provide a solid research platform for transforming the future practice of transfusion medicine.",
author = "{State of the Science in Transfusion Medicine Working Groups} and Spitalnik, {Steven L.} and Darrell Triulzi and Devine, {Dana V.} and Dzik, {Walter H.} and Eder, {Anne F.} and Terry Gernsheimer and Josephson, {Cassandra D.} and Kor, {Daryl J.} and Luban, {Naomi L.C.} and Roubinian, {Nareg H.} and Traci Mondoro and Welniak, {Lisbeth A.} and Shimian Zou and Simone Glynn and Zimring, {J. C.} and K. Yazdanbakhsh and M. Delaney and Ware, {R. E.} and A. Tinmouth and A. Doctor and Migliaccio, {A. R.} and Fergusson, {D. A.} and Widness, {J. A.} and Carson, {J. L.} and J. Hess and Roback, {J. D.} and Waters, {J. H.} and Cancelas, {J. A.} and Gladwin, {M. T.} and Rogers, {M. A.} and Ness, {P. M.} and S. Rao and Watkins, {T. R.} and Spinella, {P. C.} and Kaufman, {R. M.} and Slichter, {S. J.} and J. McCullough and N. Blumberg and Webert, {K. E.} and M. Fitzpatrick and A. Shander and Corash, {L. M.} and M. Murphy and Silberstein, {L. E.} and Dumont, {L. J.} and W. Mitchell and Macdonald, {V. W.} and Hoffmeister, {K. M.} and Italiano, {J. E.} and Barbara Bryant",
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AU - Devine, Dana V.

AU - Dzik, Walter H.

AU - Eder, Anne F.

AU - Gernsheimer, Terry

AU - Josephson, Cassandra D.

AU - Kor, Daryl J.

AU - Luban, Naomi L.C.

AU - Roubinian, Nareg H.

AU - Mondoro, Traci

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AU - Glynn, Simone

AU - Zimring, J. C.

AU - Yazdanbakhsh, K.

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AU - Ware, R. E.

AU - Tinmouth, A.

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AU - Hess, J.

AU - Roback, J. D.

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AU - Rogers, M. A.

AU - Ness, P. M.

AU - Rao, S.

AU - Watkins, T. R.

AU - Spinella, P. C.

AU - Kaufman, R. M.

AU - Slichter, S. J.

AU - McCullough, J.

AU - Blumberg, N.

AU - Webert, K. E.

AU - Fitzpatrick, M.

AU - Shander, A.

AU - Corash, L. M.

AU - Murphy, M.

AU - Silberstein, L. E.

AU - Dumont, L. J.

AU - Mitchell, W.

AU - Macdonald, V. W.

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AU - Italiano, J. E.

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DO - 10.1111/trf.13250

M3 - Review article

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