25 years of biomedical optoacoustics

From idea to optoacoustic imaging and theranostics

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    Abstract

    We proposed to use optoacoustics (photoacoustics) for biomedical applications and for more than 25 years have been working on it. In this overview we present our major biomedical optoacoustics achievements over these years. Optoacoustic diagnostic modality is based on thermoelastic generation of optoacoustic waves and combines high optical contrast and ultrasound spatial resolution. We proposed to use the optoacoustic technique for a number of applications including cancer detection in breast, prostate, and other organs; hematoma detection and characterization; monitoring of thermotherapy (hyperthermia, coagulation, freezing); monitoring of cerebral blood oxygenation in adults, neonatal patients, fetuses during late stage labor; monitoring of central venous oxygenation and total hemoglobin concentration. In early 90s we started from ideas, basic science, and first in vitro studies. In mid 90s we demonstrated optoacousitc wave: 1) detection from tissues at cm-depths (well beyond the light diffusion limit); 2) detection from microscopic tissue volumes; 3) diffraction and attenuation effects in tissues. Then we reconstructed first optoacoustic images of tissue phantoms and tissues. We developed optoacoustic methods and systems (including highly-compact laser diode systems) for monitoring, mapping, and imaging in many organs (including the human brain) and tested them in small and large animal studies and in clinical studies in healthy volunteers and patients with traumatic brain injury, circulatory shock, and anemia as well as in neonatal and fetal patients. Recently, we proposed to use optoacoustic therapy and theranostics and tested them in animal studies. At present, biomedical optoacoustics is an emerging diagnostic imaging modality with a great potential to become an invaluable tool for diagnostics, therapy, and theranostics.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Title of host publicationPhotons Plus Ultrasound
    Subtitle of host publicationImaging and Sensing 2019
    EditorsAlexander A. Oraevsky, Lihong V. Wang
    PublisherSPIE
    ISBN (Electronic)9781510623989
    DOIs
    StatePublished - Jan 1 2019
    EventPhotons Plus Ultrasound: Imaging and Sensing 2019 - San Francisco, United States
    Duration: Feb 3 2019Feb 6 2019

    Publication series

    NameProgress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE
    Volume10878
    ISSN (Print)1605-7422

    Conference

    ConferencePhotons Plus Ultrasound: Imaging and Sensing 2019
    CountryUnited States
    CitySan Francisco
    Period2/3/192/6/19

    Fingerprint

    Photoacoustic effect
    Imaging techniques
    oxygenation
    organs
    animals
    Tissue
    Photoacoustic Techniques
    therapy
    brain damage
    anemias
    Semiconductor Lasers
    Induced Hyperthermia
    Oxygenation
    labor
    Monitoring
    hyperthermia
    fetuses
    hemoglobin
    Diagnostic Imaging
    coagulation

    Keywords

    • Brain
    • Diagnostic
    • Imaging
    • Monitoring
    • Noninvasive
    • Optoacoustic
    • Photoacoustic
    • Theranostics
    • Therapy

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
    • Atomic and Molecular Physics, and Optics
    • Biomaterials
    • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging

    Cite this

    Esenaliev, R. (2019). 25 years of biomedical optoacoustics: From idea to optoacoustic imaging and theranostics. In A. A. Oraevsky, & L. V. Wang (Eds.), Photons Plus Ultrasound: Imaging and Sensing 2019 [108780U] (Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE; Vol. 10878). SPIE. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2511785

    25 years of biomedical optoacoustics : From idea to optoacoustic imaging and theranostics. / Esenaliev, Rinat.

    Photons Plus Ultrasound: Imaging and Sensing 2019. ed. / Alexander A. Oraevsky; Lihong V. Wang. SPIE, 2019. 108780U (Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE; Vol. 10878).

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

    Esenaliev, R 2019, 25 years of biomedical optoacoustics: From idea to optoacoustic imaging and theranostics. in AA Oraevsky & LV Wang (eds), Photons Plus Ultrasound: Imaging and Sensing 2019., 108780U, Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE, vol. 10878, SPIE, Photons Plus Ultrasound: Imaging and Sensing 2019, San Francisco, United States, 2/3/19. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2511785
    Esenaliev R. 25 years of biomedical optoacoustics: From idea to optoacoustic imaging and theranostics. In Oraevsky AA, Wang LV, editors, Photons Plus Ultrasound: Imaging and Sensing 2019. SPIE. 2019. 108780U. (Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE). https://doi.org/10.1117/12.2511785
    Esenaliev, Rinat. / 25 years of biomedical optoacoustics : From idea to optoacoustic imaging and theranostics. Photons Plus Ultrasound: Imaging and Sensing 2019. editor / Alexander A. Oraevsky ; Lihong V. Wang. SPIE, 2019. (Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE).
    @inproceedings{72b89e1d767548a59a919d9b1d3c477c,
    title = "25 years of biomedical optoacoustics: From idea to optoacoustic imaging and theranostics",
    abstract = "We proposed to use optoacoustics (photoacoustics) for biomedical applications and for more than 25 years have been working on it. In this overview we present our major biomedical optoacoustics achievements over these years. Optoacoustic diagnostic modality is based on thermoelastic generation of optoacoustic waves and combines high optical contrast and ultrasound spatial resolution. We proposed to use the optoacoustic technique for a number of applications including cancer detection in breast, prostate, and other organs; hematoma detection and characterization; monitoring of thermotherapy (hyperthermia, coagulation, freezing); monitoring of cerebral blood oxygenation in adults, neonatal patients, fetuses during late stage labor; monitoring of central venous oxygenation and total hemoglobin concentration. In early 90s we started from ideas, basic science, and first in vitro studies. In mid 90s we demonstrated optoacousitc wave: 1) detection from tissues at cm-depths (well beyond the light diffusion limit); 2) detection from microscopic tissue volumes; 3) diffraction and attenuation effects in tissues. Then we reconstructed first optoacoustic images of tissue phantoms and tissues. We developed optoacoustic methods and systems (including highly-compact laser diode systems) for monitoring, mapping, and imaging in many organs (including the human brain) and tested them in small and large animal studies and in clinical studies in healthy volunteers and patients with traumatic brain injury, circulatory shock, and anemia as well as in neonatal and fetal patients. Recently, we proposed to use optoacoustic therapy and theranostics and tested them in animal studies. At present, biomedical optoacoustics is an emerging diagnostic imaging modality with a great potential to become an invaluable tool for diagnostics, therapy, and theranostics.",
    keywords = "Brain, Diagnostic, Imaging, Monitoring, Noninvasive, Optoacoustic, Photoacoustic, Theranostics, Therapy",
    author = "Rinat Esenaliev",
    year = "2019",
    month = "1",
    day = "1",
    doi = "10.1117/12.2511785",
    language = "English (US)",
    series = "Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE",
    publisher = "SPIE",
    editor = "Oraevsky, {Alexander A.} and Wang, {Lihong V.}",
    booktitle = "Photons Plus Ultrasound",

    }

    TY - GEN

    T1 - 25 years of biomedical optoacoustics

    T2 - From idea to optoacoustic imaging and theranostics

    AU - Esenaliev, Rinat

    PY - 2019/1/1

    Y1 - 2019/1/1

    N2 - We proposed to use optoacoustics (photoacoustics) for biomedical applications and for more than 25 years have been working on it. In this overview we present our major biomedical optoacoustics achievements over these years. Optoacoustic diagnostic modality is based on thermoelastic generation of optoacoustic waves and combines high optical contrast and ultrasound spatial resolution. We proposed to use the optoacoustic technique for a number of applications including cancer detection in breast, prostate, and other organs; hematoma detection and characterization; monitoring of thermotherapy (hyperthermia, coagulation, freezing); monitoring of cerebral blood oxygenation in adults, neonatal patients, fetuses during late stage labor; monitoring of central venous oxygenation and total hemoglobin concentration. In early 90s we started from ideas, basic science, and first in vitro studies. In mid 90s we demonstrated optoacousitc wave: 1) detection from tissues at cm-depths (well beyond the light diffusion limit); 2) detection from microscopic tissue volumes; 3) diffraction and attenuation effects in tissues. Then we reconstructed first optoacoustic images of tissue phantoms and tissues. We developed optoacoustic methods and systems (including highly-compact laser diode systems) for monitoring, mapping, and imaging in many organs (including the human brain) and tested them in small and large animal studies and in clinical studies in healthy volunteers and patients with traumatic brain injury, circulatory shock, and anemia as well as in neonatal and fetal patients. Recently, we proposed to use optoacoustic therapy and theranostics and tested them in animal studies. At present, biomedical optoacoustics is an emerging diagnostic imaging modality with a great potential to become an invaluable tool for diagnostics, therapy, and theranostics.

    AB - We proposed to use optoacoustics (photoacoustics) for biomedical applications and for more than 25 years have been working on it. In this overview we present our major biomedical optoacoustics achievements over these years. Optoacoustic diagnostic modality is based on thermoelastic generation of optoacoustic waves and combines high optical contrast and ultrasound spatial resolution. We proposed to use the optoacoustic technique for a number of applications including cancer detection in breast, prostate, and other organs; hematoma detection and characterization; monitoring of thermotherapy (hyperthermia, coagulation, freezing); monitoring of cerebral blood oxygenation in adults, neonatal patients, fetuses during late stage labor; monitoring of central venous oxygenation and total hemoglobin concentration. In early 90s we started from ideas, basic science, and first in vitro studies. In mid 90s we demonstrated optoacousitc wave: 1) detection from tissues at cm-depths (well beyond the light diffusion limit); 2) detection from microscopic tissue volumes; 3) diffraction and attenuation effects in tissues. Then we reconstructed first optoacoustic images of tissue phantoms and tissues. We developed optoacoustic methods and systems (including highly-compact laser diode systems) for monitoring, mapping, and imaging in many organs (including the human brain) and tested them in small and large animal studies and in clinical studies in healthy volunteers and patients with traumatic brain injury, circulatory shock, and anemia as well as in neonatal and fetal patients. Recently, we proposed to use optoacoustic therapy and theranostics and tested them in animal studies. At present, biomedical optoacoustics is an emerging diagnostic imaging modality with a great potential to become an invaluable tool for diagnostics, therapy, and theranostics.

    KW - Brain

    KW - Diagnostic

    KW - Imaging

    KW - Monitoring

    KW - Noninvasive

    KW - Optoacoustic

    KW - Photoacoustic

    KW - Theranostics

    KW - Therapy

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85065451451&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85065451451&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    U2 - 10.1117/12.2511785

    DO - 10.1117/12.2511785

    M3 - Conference contribution

    T3 - Progress in Biomedical Optics and Imaging - Proceedings of SPIE

    BT - Photons Plus Ultrasound

    A2 - Oraevsky, Alexander A.

    A2 - Wang, Lihong V.

    PB - SPIE

    ER -