A comparison of effects of thermal injury and smoke inhalation on bacterial translocation

S. E. Morris, N. Navaratnam, David Herndon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

54 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Thermal injury as well as smoke inhalation results in serious morbidity and high mortality. In a chronic ovine model, we studied the development of bacterial translocation to the mesenteric lymph node, liver, spleen, kidney, and lung following: 1) sham injury (N = 6), 2) cutaneous thermal injury (N = 5), 3) cotton smoke inhalation injury (N = 4), 4) combined thermal injury and smoke inhalation injury (N = 7). Cardiac output, mean arterial pressure, and plasma protein concentration were maintained within 10% of preinjury values. Urine output was maintained above 1 ml/kg/hour with fluid and plasma resuscitation. A wide-beam ultrasonic flow probe was chronically implanted to allow serial measurement of cephalic mesenteric arterial blood flow throughout the 48-hour experimental period. Sheep were sacrificed 48 hours following injury for quantitative organ culture of mesenteric lymph node, liver, spleen, kidney, and lung. Measurements of mesenteric blood flow demonstrated a decrease to 48 ± 8%, 80 ± 5%, and 64 ± 9% of preinjury levels in sheep receiving thermal injury, smoke inhalation injury, and combination injury, respectively. The sham animals maintained mesenteric blood flow at 102 ± 7% of control levels. Thermal injury, as well as combination thermal and smoke inhalation injury, resulted in higher levels of translocation than smoke inhalation injury alone.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)639-645
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Trauma
Volume30
Issue number6
StatePublished - 1990
Externally publishedYes

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Smoke Inhalation Injury
Bacterial Translocation
Hot Temperature
Wounds and Injuries
Sheep
Spleen
Lymph Nodes
Kidney
Lung
Liver
Organ Culture Techniques
Ultrasonics
Resuscitation
Smoke
Cardiac Output
Inhalation
Blood Proteins
Arterial Pressure
Head
Urine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Morris, S. E., Navaratnam, N., & Herndon, D. (1990). A comparison of effects of thermal injury and smoke inhalation on bacterial translocation. Journal of Trauma, 30(6), 639-645.

A comparison of effects of thermal injury and smoke inhalation on bacterial translocation. / Morris, S. E.; Navaratnam, N.; Herndon, David.

In: Journal of Trauma, Vol. 30, No. 6, 1990, p. 639-645.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Morris, SE, Navaratnam, N & Herndon, D 1990, 'A comparison of effects of thermal injury and smoke inhalation on bacterial translocation', Journal of Trauma, vol. 30, no. 6, pp. 639-645.
Morris, S. E. ; Navaratnam, N. ; Herndon, David. / A comparison of effects of thermal injury and smoke inhalation on bacterial translocation. In: Journal of Trauma. 1990 ; Vol. 30, No. 6. pp. 639-645.
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