A Comparison of Faculty-Led Small Group Learning in Combination with Computer-Based Instruction Versus Computer-Based Instruction Alone on Identifying Simulated Pulmonary Sounds

Bernard Karnath, Mandira Das Carlo, Mark Holden

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Computer-based learning has gained widespread acceptance in medical curricula, but can it replace faculty-led teaching. Purpose: To investigate the effectiveness of independent computer-based learning of pulmonary auscultation alone and in combination with faculty-led teaching. Methods: The first method involved independent computer-based instruction (CBI; Group 1) of 113 second-year medical students. The second method involved a combination of faculty-led instruction and independent CBI (Group 2) of 79 second-year medical students. A pretest-posttest method of assessment was used. Results: The pretest showed recognition rates of 48% for Group 1 and 46% for Group 2, whereas the posttest showed recognition rates of 81% for Group 1 and 88% for Group 2. The posttest clinical correlation scores were identical with both groups scoring 93%. Conclusions: The study demonstrates that student learning of pulmonary auscultation is similar whether a computer-based independent instructional approach is used alone or in combination with faculty-led sessions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)23-27
Number of pages5
JournalTeaching and Learning in Medicine
Volume16
Issue number1
StatePublished - Dec 2004

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Respiratory Sounds
small group
Learning
instruction
Auscultation
Medical Students
learning
Teaching
Group
Lung
medical student
Curriculum
group instruction
Students
acceptance
curriculum
Recognition (Psychology)
student

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)
  • Education

Cite this

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