A comprehensive review of the treatment of Merkel cell carcinoma

Tony Y. Eng, Melisa G. Boersma, Clifton D. Fuller, Virginia Goytia, William E. Jones, Melissa Joyner, Dominic D. Nguyen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

92 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is an uncommon but malignant cutaneous neuroendocrine carcinoma with a high incidence of local recurrence, regional lymph node metastases, and subsequent distant metastases. The etiology of MCC remains unknown. It usually occurs in sun-exposed areas in elderly people, many of whom have a history of other synchronous or metachronous sun-associated skin lesions. The outcome for most patients with MCC is generally poor. Surgery is the mainstay of treatment. The role of adjuvant therapy has been debated. However, data from recent development support a multimodality approach, including surgical excision of primary tumor with adequate margins and sentinel lymph node dissection followed by postoperative radiotherapy in most cases, as current choice of practice with better locoregional control and disease-free survival. Patients with regional nodal involvement or advanced disease should undergo nodal dissection followed by adjuvant radiotherapy and, perhaps, systemic platinum-based chemotherapy in most cases.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)624-636
Number of pages13
JournalAmerican Journal of Clinical Oncology: Cancer Clinical Trials
Volume30
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2007
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Merkel Cell Carcinoma
Solar System
Neoplasm Metastasis
Neuroendocrine Carcinoma
Skin
Adjuvant Radiotherapy
Platinum
Lymph Node Excision
Disease-Free Survival
Dissection
Radiotherapy
Therapeutics
Lymph Nodes
Recurrence
Drug Therapy
Incidence
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • Chemotherapy
  • Merkel cell carcinoma
  • Multimodality management
  • Radiation therapy
  • Surgery

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Eng, T. Y., Boersma, M. G., Fuller, C. D., Goytia, V., Jones, W. E., Joyner, M., & Nguyen, D. D. (2007). A comprehensive review of the treatment of Merkel cell carcinoma. American Journal of Clinical Oncology: Cancer Clinical Trials, 30(6), 624-636. https://doi.org/10.1097/COC.0b013e318142c882

A comprehensive review of the treatment of Merkel cell carcinoma. / Eng, Tony Y.; Boersma, Melisa G.; Fuller, Clifton D.; Goytia, Virginia; Jones, William E.; Joyner, Melissa; Nguyen, Dominic D.

In: American Journal of Clinical Oncology: Cancer Clinical Trials, Vol. 30, No. 6, 12.2007, p. 624-636.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Eng, TY, Boersma, MG, Fuller, CD, Goytia, V, Jones, WE, Joyner, M & Nguyen, DD 2007, 'A comprehensive review of the treatment of Merkel cell carcinoma', American Journal of Clinical Oncology: Cancer Clinical Trials, vol. 30, no. 6, pp. 624-636. https://doi.org/10.1097/COC.0b013e318142c882
Eng, Tony Y. ; Boersma, Melisa G. ; Fuller, Clifton D. ; Goytia, Virginia ; Jones, William E. ; Joyner, Melissa ; Nguyen, Dominic D. / A comprehensive review of the treatment of Merkel cell carcinoma. In: American Journal of Clinical Oncology: Cancer Clinical Trials. 2007 ; Vol. 30, No. 6. pp. 624-636.
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