A High School-Based Evaluation of TakeCARE, a Video Bystander Program to Prevent Adolescent Relationship Violence

Kelli S. Sargent, Ernest N. Jouriles, David Rosenfield, Renee McDonald

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

27 Scopus citations

Abstract

Although bystander programs to prevent relationship and sexual violence have been evaluated with college students, few evaluations have been conducted with high school students. This study evaluated the effectiveness of TakeCARE, a brief video bystander program designed to promote helpful bystander behavior in situations involving relationship violence among high school students. Students (N = 1295; 52.5% female; 72.3% Hispanic) reported their bystander behavior at a baseline assessment. Classrooms (N = 66) were randomized to view TakeCARE or to a control condition, and high school counselors administered the video in the classrooms assigned to view TakeCARE. Students again reported their bystander behavior at a follow-up assessment approximately 3 months afterward. Results indicate that students who viewed TakeCARE reported more helpful bystander behavior at the follow-up assessment than students in the control condition. Results of exploratory analyses of the likelihood of encountering and intervening upon specific situations calling for bystander behavior are also reported. TakeCARE is efficacious when implemented in an urban high school by high school counselors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)633-643
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Youth and Adolescence
Volume46
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2017
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Adolescent relationship violence
  • Bystander intervention
  • High school
  • Randomized-controlled trial

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

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