A household-based, case-control study of environmental factors associated with hantavirus pulmonary syndrome in the southwestern United States

J. E. Childs, J. W. Krebs, Thomas Ksiazek, G. O. Maupin, K. L. Gage, P. E. Rollin, P. S. Zeitz, J. Sarisky, R. E. Enscore, J. C. Butler, J. E. Cheek, G. E. Glass, C. J. Peters

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

57 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

During an outbreak of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) in the southwestern United States, trained environmental assessment teams conducted surveys at 17 case-patient homes and matched controls from June through August 1993. Variables related to rodent abundance were quantified and standardized rodent trapping was conducted around and within households. The majority of households were located in pinon-juniper vegetation zones, and there were no significant differences in the type of house in which cases and controls lived. The only environmental factor that distinguished case households from controls was significantly higher small rodent densities (median trap success for case sites = 17.3%, 12.7% for near controls, and 8.3% for far controls). Frequency of hantaviral infection in deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) did not vary significantly among households of cases and controls, with a range of 27.5-32.5% antibody-positive. Indices of rodent fecal contamination were slightly higher in case houses. The data indicate that higher rodent densities were associated with households in which HPS cases occurred. Strategies that control rodent numbers and decrease rodent access to dwellings may reduce risk of human infection.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)393-397
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene
Volume52
Issue number5
StatePublished - 1995
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome
Southwestern United States
Case-Control Studies
Rodentia
Peromyscus
Rodent Control
Juniperus
Infection
Disease Outbreaks
Antibodies

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Parasitology
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

A household-based, case-control study of environmental factors associated with hantavirus pulmonary syndrome in the southwestern United States. / Childs, J. E.; Krebs, J. W.; Ksiazek, Thomas; Maupin, G. O.; Gage, K. L.; Rollin, P. E.; Zeitz, P. S.; Sarisky, J.; Enscore, R. E.; Butler, J. C.; Cheek, J. E.; Glass, G. E.; Peters, C. J.

In: American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, Vol. 52, No. 5, 1995, p. 393-397.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Childs, JE, Krebs, JW, Ksiazek, T, Maupin, GO, Gage, KL, Rollin, PE, Zeitz, PS, Sarisky, J, Enscore, RE, Butler, JC, Cheek, JE, Glass, GE & Peters, CJ 1995, 'A household-based, case-control study of environmental factors associated with hantavirus pulmonary syndrome in the southwestern United States', American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, vol. 52, no. 5, pp. 393-397.
Childs, J. E. ; Krebs, J. W. ; Ksiazek, Thomas ; Maupin, G. O. ; Gage, K. L. ; Rollin, P. E. ; Zeitz, P. S. ; Sarisky, J. ; Enscore, R. E. ; Butler, J. C. ; Cheek, J. E. ; Glass, G. E. ; Peters, C. J. / A household-based, case-control study of environmental factors associated with hantavirus pulmonary syndrome in the southwestern United States. In: American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. 1995 ; Vol. 52, No. 5. pp. 393-397.
@article{ce5201e2a4294c0e9e721d76bdf5e25d,
title = "A household-based, case-control study of environmental factors associated with hantavirus pulmonary syndrome in the southwestern United States",
abstract = "During an outbreak of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) in the southwestern United States, trained environmental assessment teams conducted surveys at 17 case-patient homes and matched controls from June through August 1993. Variables related to rodent abundance were quantified and standardized rodent trapping was conducted around and within households. The majority of households were located in pinon-juniper vegetation zones, and there were no significant differences in the type of house in which cases and controls lived. The only environmental factor that distinguished case households from controls was significantly higher small rodent densities (median trap success for case sites = 17.3{\%}, 12.7{\%} for near controls, and 8.3{\%} for far controls). Frequency of hantaviral infection in deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) did not vary significantly among households of cases and controls, with a range of 27.5-32.5{\%} antibody-positive. Indices of rodent fecal contamination were slightly higher in case houses. The data indicate that higher rodent densities were associated with households in which HPS cases occurred. Strategies that control rodent numbers and decrease rodent access to dwellings may reduce risk of human infection.",
author = "Childs, {J. E.} and Krebs, {J. W.} and Thomas Ksiazek and Maupin, {G. O.} and Gage, {K. L.} and Rollin, {P. E.} and Zeitz, {P. S.} and J. Sarisky and Enscore, {R. E.} and Butler, {J. C.} and Cheek, {J. E.} and Glass, {G. E.} and Peters, {C. J.}",
year = "1995",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "52",
pages = "393--397",
journal = "American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene",
issn = "0002-9637",
publisher = "American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - A household-based, case-control study of environmental factors associated with hantavirus pulmonary syndrome in the southwestern United States

AU - Childs, J. E.

AU - Krebs, J. W.

AU - Ksiazek, Thomas

AU - Maupin, G. O.

AU - Gage, K. L.

AU - Rollin, P. E.

AU - Zeitz, P. S.

AU - Sarisky, J.

AU - Enscore, R. E.

AU - Butler, J. C.

AU - Cheek, J. E.

AU - Glass, G. E.

AU - Peters, C. J.

PY - 1995

Y1 - 1995

N2 - During an outbreak of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) in the southwestern United States, trained environmental assessment teams conducted surveys at 17 case-patient homes and matched controls from June through August 1993. Variables related to rodent abundance were quantified and standardized rodent trapping was conducted around and within households. The majority of households were located in pinon-juniper vegetation zones, and there were no significant differences in the type of house in which cases and controls lived. The only environmental factor that distinguished case households from controls was significantly higher small rodent densities (median trap success for case sites = 17.3%, 12.7% for near controls, and 8.3% for far controls). Frequency of hantaviral infection in deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) did not vary significantly among households of cases and controls, with a range of 27.5-32.5% antibody-positive. Indices of rodent fecal contamination were slightly higher in case houses. The data indicate that higher rodent densities were associated with households in which HPS cases occurred. Strategies that control rodent numbers and decrease rodent access to dwellings may reduce risk of human infection.

AB - During an outbreak of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) in the southwestern United States, trained environmental assessment teams conducted surveys at 17 case-patient homes and matched controls from June through August 1993. Variables related to rodent abundance were quantified and standardized rodent trapping was conducted around and within households. The majority of households were located in pinon-juniper vegetation zones, and there were no significant differences in the type of house in which cases and controls lived. The only environmental factor that distinguished case households from controls was significantly higher small rodent densities (median trap success for case sites = 17.3%, 12.7% for near controls, and 8.3% for far controls). Frequency of hantaviral infection in deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) did not vary significantly among households of cases and controls, with a range of 27.5-32.5% antibody-positive. Indices of rodent fecal contamination were slightly higher in case houses. The data indicate that higher rodent densities were associated with households in which HPS cases occurred. Strategies that control rodent numbers and decrease rodent access to dwellings may reduce risk of human infection.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0029050413&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0029050413&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 7771603

AN - SCOPUS:0029050413

VL - 52

SP - 393

EP - 397

JO - American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene

JF - American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene

SN - 0002-9637

IS - 5

ER -