A meta-analysis of condom effectiveness in reducing sexually transmitted HIV

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

153 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Before condoms can be considered as a prophylaxis for sexually transmitted human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), their efficacy must be considered. This paper reviews evidence on condom effectiveness in reducing the risk of heterosexually transmitted human HIV. A meta-analysis conducted on data from in vivo studies of HIV discordant sexual partners is used to estimate the protective effect of condoms. Although contraceptive research indicates that condoms are 87% effective in preventing pregnancy, results of HIV transmission studies indicate that condoms may reduce risk of HIV infection by approximately 69%. Thus, efficacy may be much lower than commonly assumed, although results should be viewed tentatively due to design limitations in the original studies.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1635-1644
Number of pages10
JournalSocial Science and Medicine
Volume36
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - 1993

Fingerprint

meta-analysis
Condoms
human immunodeficiency virus
Meta-Analysis
HIV
prophylaxis
contraceptive
pregnancy
Sexual Partners
evidence
Virus Diseases
Contraceptive Agents
Meta-analysis
AIDS/HIV
Pregnancy
Research
Efficacy

Keywords

  • condoms
  • HIV prevention
  • meta-analysis
  • sexual behavior

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Economics and Econometrics
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Social Psychology
  • Development
  • Health(social science)

Cite this

A meta-analysis of condom effectiveness in reducing sexually transmitted HIV. / Weller, Susan.

In: Social Science and Medicine, Vol. 36, No. 12, 1993, p. 1635-1644.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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