A modified vaccinia Ankara vector-based vaccine protects macaques from SARS-CoV-2 infection, immune pathology, and dysfunction in the lungs

Nanda Kishore Routhu, Narayanaiah Cheedarla, Sailaja Gangadhara, Venkata Satish Bollimpelli, Arun K. Boddapati, Ayalnesh Shiferaw, Sheikh Abdul Rahman, Anusmita Sahoo, Venkata Viswanadh Edara, Lilin Lai, Katharine Floyd, Shelly Wang, Stephanie Fischinger, Caroline Atyeo, Sally A. Shin, Sanjeev Gumber, Shannon Kirejczyk, Joyce Cohen, Sherrie M. Jean, Jennifer S. WoodFawn Connor-Stroud, Rachelle L. Stammen, Amit A. Upadhyay, Kathryn Pellegrini, David Montefiori, Pei Yong Shi, Vineet D. Menachery, Galit Alter, Thomas H. Vanderford, Steven E. Bosinger, Mehul S. Suthar, Rama Rao Amara

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) vector-based vaccines are attractive because of their excellent safety and ability to induce long-lived humoral and cellular immunity in humans. Routhu et al. show that an MVA-based COVID-19 vaccine encoding prefusion-stabilized spike (MVA/S) induces strong neutralizing antibody and CD8+ T cell responses and protects macaques from SARS-CoV2 infection, immunopathology, and infection-induced B cell abnormalities in the lungs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)542-556.e9
JournalImmunity
Volume54
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 9 2021

Keywords

  • CD8 T cells
  • COVID-19
  • Modified Vaccinia Ankara
  • Neutralizing antibody
  • Protection
  • Rhesus macaques
  • SARS-CoV-2
  • Spike
  • Vaccine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology
  • Infectious Diseases

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