A mycoprotein based high-protein vegan diet supports equivalent daily myofibrillar protein synthesis rates compared with an isonitrogenous omnivorous diet in older adults: a randomized controlled trial

Alistair J. Monteyne, Mandy V. Dunlop, David J. Machin, Mariana O.C. Coelho, George F. Pavis, Craig Porter, Andrew J. Murton, Doaa R. Abdelrahman, Marlou L. Dirks, Francis B. Stephens, Benjamin T. Wall

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Animal-derived dietary protein ingestion and physical activity stimulate myofibrillar protein synthesis rates in older adults. We determined whether a non-animal-derived diet can support daily myofibrillar protein synthesis rates to the same extent as an omnivorous diet. Nineteen healthy older adults (age 66±1 y; BMI 24±1 kg·m-2; m=12, f=7) participated in a randomised, parallel-group, controlled trial during which they consumed a 3-day isocaloric high-protein (1.8 g·kg body mass-1·d-1) diet, where the protein was provided from predominantly (71%) animal (OMNI; n=9; m=6, f=3) or exclusively vegan (VEG; n=10; m=6, f=4; mycoprotein providing 57% of daily protein intake) sources. During the dietary control period participants conducted a daily bout of unilateral resistance-type leg extension exercise. Prior to the dietary control period participants ingested 400 mL deuterated water, with 50 mL doses consumed daily thereafter. Saliva samples were collected throughout to determine body water deuterium (2H) enrichments, and muscle samples were collected from rested and exercised muscle to determine daily myofibrillar protein synthesis rates. Deuterated water dosing resulted in body water 2H enrichments of ∼0.78±0.03%. Daily myofibrillar protein synthesis rates were 13±8 (P=0.169) and 12±4% (P=0.016) greater in the exercised compared with rested leg (1.59±0.12 vs 1.77±0.12 %·d-1 and 1.76±0.14 vs 1.93±0.12 %·d-1) in OMNI and VEG groups, respectively. Daily myofibrillar protein synthesis rates did not differ between OMNI and VEG in either rested or exercised muscle (P>0.05). Over the course of a three day intervention, omnivorous or vegan derived dietary protein sources can support equivalent rested and exercised daily myofibrillar protein synthesis rates in healthy older adults consuming a high-protein diet.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalBritish Journal of Nutrition
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2020

Keywords

  • dietary protein
  • muscle protein synthesis
  • mycoprotein
  • Sarcopenia
  • skeletal muscle

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

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