A nationwide review of the treatment patterns of traumatic thumb amputations

Christopher M. Shale, James E. Tidwell, Ryan Patrick Mulligan, Daniel Jupiter, Raman C. Mahabir

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Traumatic thumb amputations are a common problem with significant associated cost to patients, hospitals, and society. The purpose of this study was to review practice patterns for traumatic thumb amputations using the National Trauma Data Bank. By using a large nationwide database, we hoped to better understand the epidemiology and predictors of attempts and successful replantation. The design was a retrospective review of the National Trauma Data Bank between the years 2007 and 2010, investigating patients with traumatic thumb amputations. Analyses of these patients based on replantation attempt, mechanism of injury, and demographics were performed. Comparisons were made between hospitals based on teaching status and on patient volume for replant attempt and success rates. There were 3341 traumatic thumb amputations with 550 (16.5%) attempts at replantation and an overall success rate of 84.9%. Nonteaching hospitals treated 1238 (37.1%) patients, and attempted 123 (9.9%) replantations with a success rate of 80.5%. Teaching hospitals treated 2103 (63.0%) patients, and attempted 427 (20.3%) replantations with a success rate of 86.2%. Being in a teaching hospital increased the odds of attempted replantation by a factor of 3.1 (P G 0.001) when compared to a nonteaching hospital. Treatment at a high-volume center increased the rate of attempted replantation by a factor of 3.4 (P G 0.001), as compared to low-volume hospitals. Practice patterns show that teaching and high-volume hospitals attempt to replant a higher percentage of amputated thumbs. Success rates are similar across practice settings.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)647-651
Number of pages5
JournalAnnals of Plastic Surgery
Volume70
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2013
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Traumatic Amputation
Replantation
Thumb
Databases
Teaching Hospitals
Therapeutics
Teaching
Wounds and Injuries
Low-Volume Hospitals
Hospital Societies
High-Volume Hospitals
Epidemiology
Demography
Costs and Cost Analysis

Keywords

  • National Trauma Data Bank
  • Thumb
  • Traumatic Thumb Amputation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

A nationwide review of the treatment patterns of traumatic thumb amputations. / Shale, Christopher M.; Tidwell, James E.; Mulligan, Ryan Patrick; Jupiter, Daniel; Mahabir, Raman C.

In: Annals of Plastic Surgery, Vol. 70, No. 6, 06.2013, p. 647-651.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Shale, Christopher M. ; Tidwell, James E. ; Mulligan, Ryan Patrick ; Jupiter, Daniel ; Mahabir, Raman C. / A nationwide review of the treatment patterns of traumatic thumb amputations. In: Annals of Plastic Surgery. 2013 ; Vol. 70, No. 6. pp. 647-651.
@article{17ef27fa3a7345608e895417a0b52501,
title = "A nationwide review of the treatment patterns of traumatic thumb amputations",
abstract = "Traumatic thumb amputations are a common problem with significant associated cost to patients, hospitals, and society. The purpose of this study was to review practice patterns for traumatic thumb amputations using the National Trauma Data Bank. By using a large nationwide database, we hoped to better understand the epidemiology and predictors of attempts and successful replantation. The design was a retrospective review of the National Trauma Data Bank between the years 2007 and 2010, investigating patients with traumatic thumb amputations. Analyses of these patients based on replantation attempt, mechanism of injury, and demographics were performed. Comparisons were made between hospitals based on teaching status and on patient volume for replant attempt and success rates. There were 3341 traumatic thumb amputations with 550 (16.5{\%}) attempts at replantation and an overall success rate of 84.9{\%}. Nonteaching hospitals treated 1238 (37.1{\%}) patients, and attempted 123 (9.9{\%}) replantations with a success rate of 80.5{\%}. Teaching hospitals treated 2103 (63.0{\%}) patients, and attempted 427 (20.3{\%}) replantations with a success rate of 86.2{\%}. Being in a teaching hospital increased the odds of attempted replantation by a factor of 3.1 (P G 0.001) when compared to a nonteaching hospital. Treatment at a high-volume center increased the rate of attempted replantation by a factor of 3.4 (P G 0.001), as compared to low-volume hospitals. Practice patterns show that teaching and high-volume hospitals attempt to replant a higher percentage of amputated thumbs. Success rates are similar across practice settings.",
keywords = "National Trauma Data Bank, Thumb, Traumatic Thumb Amputation",
author = "Shale, {Christopher M.} and Tidwell, {James E.} and Mulligan, {Ryan Patrick} and Daniel Jupiter and Mahabir, {Raman C.}",
year = "2013",
month = "6",
doi = "10.1097/SAP.0b013e31828986c9",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "70",
pages = "647--651",
journal = "Annals of Plastic Surgery",
issn = "0148-7043",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - A nationwide review of the treatment patterns of traumatic thumb amputations

AU - Shale, Christopher M.

AU - Tidwell, James E.

AU - Mulligan, Ryan Patrick

AU - Jupiter, Daniel

AU - Mahabir, Raman C.

PY - 2013/6

Y1 - 2013/6

N2 - Traumatic thumb amputations are a common problem with significant associated cost to patients, hospitals, and society. The purpose of this study was to review practice patterns for traumatic thumb amputations using the National Trauma Data Bank. By using a large nationwide database, we hoped to better understand the epidemiology and predictors of attempts and successful replantation. The design was a retrospective review of the National Trauma Data Bank between the years 2007 and 2010, investigating patients with traumatic thumb amputations. Analyses of these patients based on replantation attempt, mechanism of injury, and demographics were performed. Comparisons were made between hospitals based on teaching status and on patient volume for replant attempt and success rates. There were 3341 traumatic thumb amputations with 550 (16.5%) attempts at replantation and an overall success rate of 84.9%. Nonteaching hospitals treated 1238 (37.1%) patients, and attempted 123 (9.9%) replantations with a success rate of 80.5%. Teaching hospitals treated 2103 (63.0%) patients, and attempted 427 (20.3%) replantations with a success rate of 86.2%. Being in a teaching hospital increased the odds of attempted replantation by a factor of 3.1 (P G 0.001) when compared to a nonteaching hospital. Treatment at a high-volume center increased the rate of attempted replantation by a factor of 3.4 (P G 0.001), as compared to low-volume hospitals. Practice patterns show that teaching and high-volume hospitals attempt to replant a higher percentage of amputated thumbs. Success rates are similar across practice settings.

AB - Traumatic thumb amputations are a common problem with significant associated cost to patients, hospitals, and society. The purpose of this study was to review practice patterns for traumatic thumb amputations using the National Trauma Data Bank. By using a large nationwide database, we hoped to better understand the epidemiology and predictors of attempts and successful replantation. The design was a retrospective review of the National Trauma Data Bank between the years 2007 and 2010, investigating patients with traumatic thumb amputations. Analyses of these patients based on replantation attempt, mechanism of injury, and demographics were performed. Comparisons were made between hospitals based on teaching status and on patient volume for replant attempt and success rates. There were 3341 traumatic thumb amputations with 550 (16.5%) attempts at replantation and an overall success rate of 84.9%. Nonteaching hospitals treated 1238 (37.1%) patients, and attempted 123 (9.9%) replantations with a success rate of 80.5%. Teaching hospitals treated 2103 (63.0%) patients, and attempted 427 (20.3%) replantations with a success rate of 86.2%. Being in a teaching hospital increased the odds of attempted replantation by a factor of 3.1 (P G 0.001) when compared to a nonteaching hospital. Treatment at a high-volume center increased the rate of attempted replantation by a factor of 3.4 (P G 0.001), as compared to low-volume hospitals. Practice patterns show that teaching and high-volume hospitals attempt to replant a higher percentage of amputated thumbs. Success rates are similar across practice settings.

KW - National Trauma Data Bank

KW - Thumb

KW - Traumatic Thumb Amputation

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84879098732&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84879098732&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/SAP.0b013e31828986c9

DO - 10.1097/SAP.0b013e31828986c9

M3 - Article

C2 - 23673564

AN - SCOPUS:84879098732

VL - 70

SP - 647

EP - 651

JO - Annals of Plastic Surgery

JF - Annals of Plastic Surgery

SN - 0148-7043

IS - 6

ER -