A pilot study

Influence of visual cue color on freezing of gait in persons with Parkinson's disease

Mon S. Bryant, Diana H. Rintala, Eugene C. Lai, Elizabeth J. Protas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose.To investigate the effect of red and green light beams on gait and freezing of gait (FOG) in persons with Parkinson's disease (PD). Methods.Seven persons with PD who experienced FOG participated in the study. Gait and turning performances were studied while walking with canes with red, green, and no light beams while 'off' and 'on' anti-Parkinsonian medications. Gait speed, cadence, and stride were recorded. Time and number of freezing episodes were recorded during a 50-foot walk and a 360° turn. Results.During 'off' medication, compared to no light, stride length improved when using the green light, but not the red. During the 50-foot walk, freezing episodes were reduced when using the green light compared to both the red and no light. During the 360° turn, time, number of steps and number of freezing episodes were reduced using the green light compared to the red and no light. During 'on' medication, gait speed and stride length improved more with the green light compared to the red. Neither color showed any effect on cadence during either medication state. Conclusion.A green light improved gait and alleviate FOG in persons with PD better than a red light or no light.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)456-461
Number of pages6
JournalDisability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology
Volume5
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2010

Fingerprint

Methyl Green
Gait
Freezing
Cues
Parkinson Disease
Color
Light
Canes
Walking

Keywords

  • color
  • freezing of gait
  • Parkinson's disease
  • visual cue

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Biomedical Engineering
  • Speech and Hearing
  • Rehabilitation

Cite this

A pilot study : Influence of visual cue color on freezing of gait in persons with Parkinson's disease. / Bryant, Mon S.; Rintala, Diana H.; Lai, Eugene C.; Protas, Elizabeth J.

In: Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, Vol. 5, No. 6, 11.2010, p. 456-461.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bryant, Mon S. ; Rintala, Diana H. ; Lai, Eugene C. ; Protas, Elizabeth J. / A pilot study : Influence of visual cue color on freezing of gait in persons with Parkinson's disease. In: Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology. 2010 ; Vol. 5, No. 6. pp. 456-461.
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