A Pilot Study of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy of Insomnia in People with Mild Depression

Daniel J. Taylor, Kenneth L. Lichstein, Jeremiah Weinstock, Stacy Sanford, Jeffrey Temple

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

114 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In some cases, insomnia and depression may have a reciprocal relationship, in which each aggravates and maintains the other. To test the hypothesis that reduction of insomnia would result in reduction of depression in patients (N = 10) with both disorders, a repeated-measures design was used comparing depression and insomnia levels before and after 6 sessions of cognitive-behavioral therapy of insomnia. Posttreatment, 100% of completers (n = 8) had a normalized sleeping pattern, and 87.5% had normalized depression scores. Significant posttreatment improvement was seen in sleep onset latency (- 31 min), wake time after sleep onset (- 24 min), total sleep time (+ 65 min), sleep efficiency (+ 14%), and sleep quality (+ 19%), which was maintained at 3-month follow-up. A decreasing trend occurred in depression scores from pre- to posttreatment, which reached significance at 3-month follow-up. Intent-to-treat analyses showed similar results.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)49-57
Number of pages9
JournalBehavior Therapy
Volume38
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2007
Externally publishedYes

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Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders
Cognitive Therapy
Sleep
Depression

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Clinical Psychology

Cite this

A Pilot Study of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy of Insomnia in People with Mild Depression. / Taylor, Daniel J.; Lichstein, Kenneth L.; Weinstock, Jeremiah; Sanford, Stacy; Temple, Jeffrey.

In: Behavior Therapy, Vol. 38, No. 1, 03.2007, p. 49-57.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Taylor, Daniel J. ; Lichstein, Kenneth L. ; Weinstock, Jeremiah ; Sanford, Stacy ; Temple, Jeffrey. / A Pilot Study of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy of Insomnia in People with Mild Depression. In: Behavior Therapy. 2007 ; Vol. 38, No. 1. pp. 49-57.
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