A population-based study of job stress in Mexican Americans, non-hispanic blacks, and non-hispanic whites

Norma Perez, Luisa Franzini, Daniel H. Freeman, Hyunsu Ju, Mary Peek

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

There is little known about the association between socioeconomic status and job stress in Mexican Americans. To address this issue, data were originated on a community level using personal interviews from working Mexican Americans using a multistage probability sample. In this study we described the population's sociodemographic characteristics, health conditions, and job stress measures in Mexican Americans, non-Hispanic Whites, and non-Hispanic Blacks. Regression models were used to examine the associations of sociodemographic characteristics and health conditions for each job stress measure among 937 individuals. Our results indicate an association between low socioeconomic status and the perception of less job control, less job security, and less social support. Mexican Americans demonstrated more job security and social support in comparison to non-Hispanic Whites of similar socioeconomic status. We were able to define potential factors that may contribute to an individual's perception of job stress.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)221-233
Number of pages13
JournalHispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences
Volume33
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2011

Fingerprint

Social Class
social status
job security
Social Support
Population
social support
Sampling Studies
Health
Population Characteristics
health
Interviews
regression
interview
community

Keywords

  • ethnicity
  • job stress
  • Mexican American
  • socioeconomic status

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Anthropology
  • Cultural Studies
  • Linguistics and Language

Cite this

A population-based study of job stress in Mexican Americans, non-hispanic blacks, and non-hispanic whites. / Perez, Norma; Franzini, Luisa; Freeman, Daniel H.; Ju, Hyunsu; Peek, Mary.

In: Hispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences, Vol. 33, No. 2, 05.2011, p. 221-233.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Perez, Norma ; Franzini, Luisa ; Freeman, Daniel H. ; Ju, Hyunsu ; Peek, Mary. / A population-based study of job stress in Mexican Americans, non-hispanic blacks, and non-hispanic whites. In: Hispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences. 2011 ; Vol. 33, No. 2. pp. 221-233.
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