A prospective study of infections in hemodialysis patients

patient hygiene and other risk factors for infection.

L. G. Kaplowitz, J. A. Comstock, D. M. Landwehr, H. P. Dalton, C. G. Mayhall

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

72 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We performed a prospective randomized study on 71 patients on chronic outpatient hemodialysis to determine whether a sterile technique was better than a clean technique for preparation of the skin over the vascular access site prior to cannulation. In addition, we wanted to determine overall and site-specific infection rates, microbial etiologies of infection, and risk factors for infection. The overall infection rate was 4.7 infections per 100 dialysis months; the vascular access-site infection rate was 1.3 infections per 100 dialysis months; and the rate for bacteremia was 0.7 cases per 100 dialysis months. Staphylococcus aureus was the most common pathogen, but infections were equally divided between gram-positive cocci and gram-negative bacilli. Advanced age (P = 0.02), a low Karnofsky activity score (P = 0.05), poor hygiene (P = 0.0004) and number of hospitalizations (P = 0.0002) were risk factors for infections in general while only poor hygiene (P = 0.002) was a risk factor for vascular access-site infection. Sterile preparation of the skin over the vascular access site was no more effective at preventing infection than was clean technique (P = 0.80). Maintenance of good personal hygiene may be one of the most important measures for prevention of infections in hemodialysis patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)534-541
Number of pages8
JournalInfection control and hospital epidemiology : the official journal of the Society of Hospital Epidemiologists of America
Volume9
Issue number12
StatePublished - Dec 1988
Externally publishedYes

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Hygiene
Renal Dialysis
Prospective Studies
Infection
Blood Vessels
Dialysis
Gram-Positive Cocci
Skin
Bacteremia
Catheterization
Bacillus
Staphylococcus aureus
Hospitalization
Outpatients

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Microbiology (medical)

Cite this

A prospective study of infections in hemodialysis patients : patient hygiene and other risk factors for infection. / Kaplowitz, L. G.; Comstock, J. A.; Landwehr, D. M.; Dalton, H. P.; Mayhall, C. G.

In: Infection control and hospital epidemiology : the official journal of the Society of Hospital Epidemiologists of America, Vol. 9, No. 12, 12.1988, p. 534-541.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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