A protocol for imaging alternative splicing regulation in vivo using fluorescence reporters in transgenic mice

Vivian I. Bonano, Sebastian Oltean, Mariano Garcia-Blanco

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

23 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Imaging technologies are influencing the way we study regulatory processes in vivo. Several recent reports use fluorescence minigenes to image alternative splicing events in living cells and animals. This type of reporter is being used to generate transgenic mice to visualize splicing regulation in diverse tissues and cell types. In this protocol, we describe how to develop animals that report on alternative splicing and how to assess reporter expression in excised organs and tissue sections. The entire procedure, from making the reporters to imaging organs and tissues in adult transgenic mice, should take approximately 1.5 years. Fluorescence reporters can be used to image many splicing decisions in normal tissues and organs and can be extended to the study of disease states.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2166-2181
Number of pages16
JournalNature Protocols
Volume2
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2007
Externally publishedYes

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Alternative Splicing
Transgenic Mice
Fluorescence
Tissue
Imaging techniques
Animals
Cells
Technology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

A protocol for imaging alternative splicing regulation in vivo using fluorescence reporters in transgenic mice. / Bonano, Vivian I.; Oltean, Sebastian; Garcia-Blanco, Mariano.

In: Nature Protocols, Vol. 2, No. 9, 09.2007, p. 2166-2181.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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