A qualitative assessment of systematic instructional design training by CLS faculty members.

Vicki Freeman, Carol Larson, J. David Holcomb

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To determine the perceived value clinical laboratory science (CLS) faculty members gave to their participation in workshops on the use of a modified systematic instruction design (SID) model to develop curriculum and on-line courses. DESIGN: A survey assessing the perceived value of SID training was sent to 27 CLS faculty members. The survey asked the respondents to assess the value of the training that they received in developing their skills in Web-based, distance learning course development and teaching, and expanding their skills in traditional course development and teaching. The eight components of SID were listed and the respondents rated each component as to its value to them on a 5-point Likert scale of 5 = very valuable to 1 = not very valuable. In addition to rating the value of each SID component, the respondents were asked if they would like more training in any of the eight components. RESULTS: A majority of the 18 respondents (67%) reported that the training in SID was valuable to them. A strong majority of the respondents indicated that their training in goal and instructional analyses (96%), media selection (94%), and aligning objectives, assessments, and instructional strategies (94%) were valuable to their distance education programs and their traditional teaching skills. CONCLUSION: Faculty members who actively participated in SID training valued their new skills in developing distance education courses as well as improving their traditional teaching activities. Research is needed on the effect these new teaching skills have on student learning.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)248-253
Number of pages6
JournalClinical laboratory science : journal of the American Society for Medical Technology.
Volume18
Issue number4
StatePublished - Sep 2005

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Medical Laboratory Science
Clinical laboratories
Teaching
Distance Education
Distance education
Curricula
Surveys and Questionnaires
Curriculum
Students
Learning
Education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

A qualitative assessment of systematic instructional design training by CLS faculty members. / Freeman, Vicki; Larson, Carol; Holcomb, J. David.

In: Clinical laboratory science : journal of the American Society for Medical Technology., Vol. 18, No. 4, 09.2005, p. 248-253.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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