A recombinant Hendra Virus G glycoprotein subunit vaccine protects nonhuman primates against hendra virus challenge

Chad Mire, Joan B. Geisbert, Krystle N. Agans, Yan Ru Feng, Karla A. Fenton, Katharine N. Bossart, Lianying Yan, Yee Peng Chan, Christopher C. Broder, Thomas Geisbert

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Hendra virus (HeV) is a zoonotic emerging virus belonging to the family Paramyxoviridae. HeV causes severe and often fatal respiratory and/or neurologic disease in both animals and humans. Currently, there are no licensed vaccines or antiviral drugs approved for human use. A number of animal models have been developed for studying HeV infection, with the African green monkey (AGM) appearing to most faithfully reproduce the human disease. Here, we assessed the utility of a newly developed recombinant subunit vaccine based on the HeV attachment (G) glycoprotein in the AGM model. Four AGMs were vaccinated with two doses of the HeV vaccine (sGHeV) containing Alhydrogel, four AGMs received the sGHeV with Alhydrogel and CpG, and four control animals did not receive the sGHeV vaccine. Animals were challenged with a high dose of infectious HeV 21 days after the boost vaccination. None of the eight specifically vaccinated animals showed any evidence of clinical illness and survived the challenge. All four controls became severely ill with symptoms consistent with HeV infection, and three of the four animals succumbed 8 days after exposure. Success of the recombinant subunit vaccine in AGMs provides pivotal data in supporting its further preclinical development for potential human use.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)4624-4631
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Virology
Volume88
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014

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Hendra Virus
Hendra virus
Subunit Vaccines
subunit vaccines
Primates
glycoproteins
Glycoproteins
Aluminum Hydroxide
Cercopithecus aethiops
Synthetic Vaccines
Vaccines
recombinant vaccines
Virus Diseases
animals
vaccines
Paramyxoviridae
antiviral agents
Virus Attachment
nervous system diseases
Zoonoses

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Virology

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A recombinant Hendra Virus G glycoprotein subunit vaccine protects nonhuman primates against hendra virus challenge. / Mire, Chad; Geisbert, Joan B.; Agans, Krystle N.; Feng, Yan Ru; Fenton, Karla A.; Bossart, Katharine N.; Yan, Lianying; Chan, Yee Peng; Broder, Christopher C.; Geisbert, Thomas.

In: Journal of Virology, Vol. 88, No. 9, 2014, p. 4624-4631.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Mire, C, Geisbert, JB, Agans, KN, Feng, YR, Fenton, KA, Bossart, KN, Yan, L, Chan, YP, Broder, CC & Geisbert, T 2014, 'A recombinant Hendra Virus G glycoprotein subunit vaccine protects nonhuman primates against hendra virus challenge', Journal of Virology, vol. 88, no. 9, pp. 4624-4631. https://doi.org/10.1128/JVI.00005-14
Mire, Chad ; Geisbert, Joan B. ; Agans, Krystle N. ; Feng, Yan Ru ; Fenton, Karla A. ; Bossart, Katharine N. ; Yan, Lianying ; Chan, Yee Peng ; Broder, Christopher C. ; Geisbert, Thomas. / A recombinant Hendra Virus G glycoprotein subunit vaccine protects nonhuman primates against hendra virus challenge. In: Journal of Virology. 2014 ; Vol. 88, No. 9. pp. 4624-4631.
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