Accelerated type 1 diabetes induction in mice by adoptive transfer of diabetogenic CD4+ T cells.

Gregory Berry, Hanspeter Waldner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse spontaneously develops autoimmune diabetes after 12 weeks of age and is the most extensively studied animal model of human Type 1 diabetes (T1D). Cell transfer studies in irradiated recipient mice have established that T cells are pivotal in T1D pathogenesis in this model. We describe herein a simple method to rapidly induce T1D by adoptive transfer of purified, primary CD4+ T cells from pre-diabetic NOD mice transgenic for the islet-specific T cell receptor (TCR) BDC2.5 into NOD.SCID recipient mice. The major advantages of this technique are that isolation and adoptive transfer of diabetogenic T cells can be completed within the same day, irradiation of the recipients is not required, and a high incidence of T1D is elicited within 2 weeks after T cell transfer. Thus, studies of pathogenesis and therapeutic interventions in T1D can proceed at a faster rate than with methods that rely on heterogenous T cell populations or clones derived from diabetic NOD mice.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of visualized experiments : JoVE
Issue number75
StatePublished - 2013
Externally publishedYes

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T-cells
Adoptive Transfer
Medical problems
Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus
T-Lymphocytes
Inbred NOD Mouse
SCID Mice
T-Cell Antigen Receptor
Animals
Animal Models
Clone Cells
Irradiation
Incidence
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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Accelerated type 1 diabetes induction in mice by adoptive transfer of diabetogenic CD4+ T cells. / Berry, Gregory; Waldner, Hanspeter.

In: Journal of visualized experiments : JoVE, No. 75, 2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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