Access to home apnea monitoring and its impact on rehospitalization among very-low-birth-weight infants

Michael Malloy, B. Graubard

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To examine the relationship between home apnea monitoring and sociodemographic, socioeconomic, and medical factors and the risk for rehospitalization among very-low-birth-weight infants (birth weight <1500 g). Design and Setting: Analysis o f live infants born weighing less than 1500 g; these data were obtained from the 1988 National Maternal and Infant Health Survey. Data from this survey were obtained by maternal questionnaires and from birth certificates and medical records. Outcome Measure: One or more hospitalizations after discharge from the hospital of delivery. Results: Home apnea monitor use was strikingly lower among black infants (19.8%) compared with nonblack infants (43.7%) (P<.001). The rate of rehospitalization for blacks was 24.8%, which was lower than the rate of 34.3% for nonblacks (P=.001). Neither annual family income nor method of hospital payment was associated with rehospitalization. The use of an apnea monitor in the home was associated with an increased odds ratio for rehospitalization for both blacks (odds ratio, 2.56; 95% confidence interval, 1.56 to 4.21) and nonblacks (odds ratio, 2.28; 95% confidence interval, 1.51 to 3.45). With adjustment for the use of an apnea monitor, the odds ratio for rehospitalization of blacks vs nonblacks was no longer significant (odds ratio, 0.80; 95% confidence interval, 0.60 to 1.08). Conclusions: The use of an apnea monitor in the home was highly associated with an increased risk for rehospitalization. Whether this increased risk was attributable to a valid reason for rehospitalization or to closer scrutiny of the infant could not be determined. The lower prevalence of apnea monitor use among blacks is unexplained.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)326-332
Number of pages7
JournalArchives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine
Volume149
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1995

Fingerprint

Very Low Birth Weight Infant
Apnea
Odds Ratio
Birth Certificates
Confidence Intervals
Health Surveys
Birth Weight
Medical Records
Hospitalization
Mothers
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Access to home apnea monitoring and its impact on rehospitalization among very-low-birth-weight infants. / Malloy, Michael; Graubard, B.

In: Archives of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, Vol. 149, No. 3, 1995, p. 326-332.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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