Acculturation, Medication Adherence, Lifestyle Behaviors, and Blood Pressure Control Among Arab Americans

Ayman K. Tailakh, Lorraine Evangelista, Donald E. Morisky, Janet C. Mentes, Nancy A. Pike, Linda R. Phillips

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between acculturation, medication adherence, lifestyle behaviors (e.g., physical activity, nutrition, weight control), and blood pressure control among hypertensive Arab Americans. Design: The study utilized a cross-sectional descriptive design. A convenience sample of 126 participants completed questionnaires and had measures of blood pressure, weight, and height. Forty-six participants were hypertensive and were included in the analysis. Results: Only 29.2% of participants reported high medication adherence. High medication adherence was associated with lower diastolic blood pressure, eating a healthy diet, and following lifestyle modifications. Acculturation was significantly associated with physical activity and body mass index. Conclusion: Our study found that acculturated participants were more adherent to medications and physical activity and had better blood pressure control. Further studies are needed to explore how acculturation improves adherence and what factors contribute to better adherence in order to design culturally sensitive interventions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)57-64
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Transcultural Nursing
Volume27
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Acculturation
Medication Adherence
Life Style
Blood Pressure
Exercise
Weights and Measures
Body Mass Index
Eating

Keywords

  • acculturation
  • Arab Americans
  • hypertension
  • lifestyle behaviors
  • medication adherence
  • self-care management

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

Acculturation, Medication Adherence, Lifestyle Behaviors, and Blood Pressure Control Among Arab Americans. / Tailakh, Ayman K.; Evangelista, Lorraine; Morisky, Donald E.; Mentes, Janet C.; Pike, Nancy A.; Phillips, Linda R.

In: Journal of Transcultural Nursing, Vol. 27, No. 1, 01.01.2016, p. 57-64.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tailakh, Ayman K. ; Evangelista, Lorraine ; Morisky, Donald E. ; Mentes, Janet C. ; Pike, Nancy A. ; Phillips, Linda R. / Acculturation, Medication Adherence, Lifestyle Behaviors, and Blood Pressure Control Among Arab Americans. In: Journal of Transcultural Nursing. 2016 ; Vol. 27, No. 1. pp. 57-64.
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