ACTH increases adrenal medullary PNMT activity in neonatal rats

Tapan K. Banerji, Gerald Callas, Walter Meyer, Amir Rassoli

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Levels of plasma corticosterone and the activities of adrenomedullary dopamine-β-hydroxylase (DBH) and phenylethanolamine-N-methyltransferase (PNMT) were measured in the 7-day-old rat following the administration of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) for 7 consecutive days beginning with day 1. ACTH led to significant adrenal hypertrophy and a concomitant elevation (10 to 15 fold) of plasma corticosterone concentration. Whereas DBH activity remained unchanged, adrenal PNMT activity was increased significantly following ACTH-induced elevation of plasma corticosterone levels. These results indicate that the pituitary-adreno-cortical-adrenomedullary axis is functional in the neonatal rat. Furthermore, since the transsynaptic control mechanisms are known to be non-functional or immature in the 7-day-old rat, our data suggest that neonatal rat adrenal catecholamine biosynthesis may be largely controlled by the pituitary-adrenocortical axis via glucocorticoids.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)343-349
Number of pages7
JournalLife Sciences
Volume38
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 27 1986

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Phenylethanolamine N-Methyltransferase
Adrenocorticotropic Hormone
Rats
Corticosterone
Plasmas
Biosynthesis
Mixed Function Oxygenases
Hypertrophy
Glucocorticoids
Catecholamines
Dopamine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology

Cite this

Banerji, T. K., Callas, G., Meyer, W., & Rassoli, A. (1986). ACTH increases adrenal medullary PNMT activity in neonatal rats. Life Sciences, 38(4), 343-349. https://doi.org/10.1016/0024-3205(86)90081-0

ACTH increases adrenal medullary PNMT activity in neonatal rats. / Banerji, Tapan K.; Callas, Gerald; Meyer, Walter; Rassoli, Amir.

In: Life Sciences, Vol. 38, No. 4, 27.01.1986, p. 343-349.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Banerji, TK, Callas, G, Meyer, W & Rassoli, A 1986, 'ACTH increases adrenal medullary PNMT activity in neonatal rats', Life Sciences, vol. 38, no. 4, pp. 343-349. https://doi.org/10.1016/0024-3205(86)90081-0
Banerji, Tapan K. ; Callas, Gerald ; Meyer, Walter ; Rassoli, Amir. / ACTH increases adrenal medullary PNMT activity in neonatal rats. In: Life Sciences. 1986 ; Vol. 38, No. 4. pp. 343-349.
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