Activation of cellular oncogenes by clinical isolates and laboratory strains of human cytomegalovirus

Istvan Boldogh, S. AbuBakar, M. P. Fons, C. Z. Deng, T. Albrecht

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The effect on cellular (c) oncogene RNA levels was investigated after infection of permissive cells with cell culture adapted strains (AD-169, C-87, Davis) and unadapted clinical isolates (82-1, 84-2, 85-1) of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). The results indicate that both adapted and unadapted strains of HCMV induce substantial increases in c-oncogene RNA levels for fos, jun, and myc measured by Northern blot hybridization. Elimination of immediate early (IE) protein synthesis between 0 and 3 hrs or reduction of virus infectivity (99.99%) by UV-irradiation did not reduce the increase in c-oncogene RNA levels. Inhibition of viral and cellular protein synthesis by cycloheximide resulted in a high abundance (superinduction) of specific RNAs which hybridized to c-oncogene probes after infection with either adapted or unadapted strains of HCMV. These data suggest that IE viral gene expression is not essential for activation of c-oncogenes. Inhibition of DNA-dependent RNA synthesis by blocking RNA elongation with actinomycin-D or by inhibiting the activity of RNA polymerase II with alpha-amanitin significantly reduced the increase in c-oncogene RNA levels, suggesting that activation of cellular genes by HCMV is controlled at the level of transcription. Activation of c-oncogenes by HCMV may be particularly important because their protein products appear to be involved in initiation and regulation of viral and cellular gene expression.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)241-247
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Medical Virology
Volume34
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1991
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Cytomegalovirus
Oncogenes
RNA
Viral Gene Expression Regulation
Alpha-Amanitin
Immediate-Early Proteins
Immediate-Early Genes
Viral Genes
RNA Polymerase II
Dactinomycin
Viral Proteins
Cycloheximide
Infection
Northern Blotting
Transcriptional Activation
Cell Culture Techniques
Viruses
Gene Expression
DNA
Proteins

Keywords

  • cellular oncogene activation
  • clinical isolates
  • HCMV

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Virology

Cite this

Activation of cellular oncogenes by clinical isolates and laboratory strains of human cytomegalovirus. / Boldogh, Istvan; AbuBakar, S.; Fons, M. P.; Deng, C. Z.; Albrecht, T.

In: Journal of Medical Virology, Vol. 34, No. 4, 1991, p. 241-247.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Boldogh, Istvan ; AbuBakar, S. ; Fons, M. P. ; Deng, C. Z. ; Albrecht, T. / Activation of cellular oncogenes by clinical isolates and laboratory strains of human cytomegalovirus. In: Journal of Medical Virology. 1991 ; Vol. 34, No. 4. pp. 241-247.
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