Adaptation to pregnancy and motherhood among subfecund and fecund primiparous women.

L. J. Halman, D. Oakley, R. Lederman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE. To examine the effects of infertility treatment on women's ability to adapt to pregnancy and motherhood. METHODS. Fecund (n = 261) and subfecund (n = 103) primiparous women receiving obstetrical care in southeastern Michigan participated in this descriptive, correlational, prospective study. The subjects completed Lederman's Pre-Natal Self-Evaluation questionnaire during the third trimester of pregnancy and Lederman's Postpartum Self-Evaluation questionnaire during the first postpartum appointment. FINDINGS. Mean scores showed that the two groups of women were not significantly different with either adaptation to pregnancy or motherhood. CONCLUSIONS & IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING. Although subfecund women may experience stress in order to achieve a pregnancy, there do not appear to be any latent effects of this stress on their ability to adapt to pregnancy or motherhood.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)90-100
Number of pages11
JournalMaternal-Child Nursing Journal
Volume23
Issue number3
StatePublished - Jul 1995
Externally publishedYes

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Pregnancy
Diagnostic Self Evaluation
Aptitude
Postpartum Period
Third Pregnancy Trimester
Infertility
Appointments and Schedules
Prospective Studies
Surveys and Questionnaires
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Adaptation to pregnancy and motherhood among subfecund and fecund primiparous women. / Halman, L. J.; Oakley, D.; Lederman, R.

In: Maternal-Child Nursing Journal, Vol. 23, No. 3, 07.1995, p. 90-100.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Halman, L. J. ; Oakley, D. ; Lederman, R. / Adaptation to pregnancy and motherhood among subfecund and fecund primiparous women. In: Maternal-Child Nursing Journal. 1995 ; Vol. 23, No. 3. pp. 90-100.
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