Adherence treatment factors in hypertensive African American women

Marie N. Fongwa, Lorraine Evangelista, Ron D. Hays, David S. Martins, David Elashoff, Marie J. Cowan, Donald E. Morisky

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

42 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Hypertension among African American women is of epidemic proportions. Nonadherence to treatment contributes to uncontrolled blood pressure in this population. Factors associated with adherence to treatment in African American women are unknown. The purpose of this study was to identify factors associated with adherence to hypertension treatment in African American women. Methods: Five audio-taped focus groups were conducted with hypertensive African American women, 35 years and older receiving treatment for hypertension from an inner-city free clinic. All transcripts from the tapes were analyzed for content describing adherence to treatment factors. Findings: Factors associated with adherence to treatment in hypertensive African American women were in three main categories including: beliefs about hypertension, facilitators of adherence to treatment, and barriers to adherence to treatment. Implications: The study supports the need for education on managing hypertension and medication side effects, early screening for depression in hypertensive African Americans, development of culturally sensitive hypertension educational material, and formation of support groups for promoting adherence to treatment among African American women with hypertension.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)157-166
Number of pages10
JournalVascular Health and Risk Management
Volume4
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 7 2008
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

African Americans
Hypertension
Therapeutics
hypertensive factor
Self-Help Groups
Focus Groups
Blood Pressure
Education
Population

Keywords

  • Adherence
  • African American
  • Hypertension treatment factors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Hematology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

Fongwa, M. N., Evangelista, L., Hays, R. D., Martins, D. S., Elashoff, D., Cowan, M. J., & Morisky, D. E. (2008). Adherence treatment factors in hypertensive African American women. Vascular Health and Risk Management, 4(1), 157-166. https://doi.org/10.2147/vhrm.2008.04.01.157

Adherence treatment factors in hypertensive African American women. / Fongwa, Marie N.; Evangelista, Lorraine; Hays, Ron D.; Martins, David S.; Elashoff, David; Cowan, Marie J.; Morisky, Donald E.

In: Vascular Health and Risk Management, Vol. 4, No. 1, 07.04.2008, p. 157-166.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fongwa, MN, Evangelista, L, Hays, RD, Martins, DS, Elashoff, D, Cowan, MJ & Morisky, DE 2008, 'Adherence treatment factors in hypertensive African American women', Vascular Health and Risk Management, vol. 4, no. 1, pp. 157-166. https://doi.org/10.2147/vhrm.2008.04.01.157
Fongwa, Marie N. ; Evangelista, Lorraine ; Hays, Ron D. ; Martins, David S. ; Elashoff, David ; Cowan, Marie J. ; Morisky, Donald E. / Adherence treatment factors in hypertensive African American women. In: Vascular Health and Risk Management. 2008 ; Vol. 4, No. 1. pp. 157-166.
@article{dba44c5ef09146fa8a9f990f27673159,
title = "Adherence treatment factors in hypertensive African American women",
abstract = "Background: Hypertension among African American women is of epidemic proportions. Nonadherence to treatment contributes to uncontrolled blood pressure in this population. Factors associated with adherence to treatment in African American women are unknown. The purpose of this study was to identify factors associated with adherence to hypertension treatment in African American women. Methods: Five audio-taped focus groups were conducted with hypertensive African American women, 35 years and older receiving treatment for hypertension from an inner-city free clinic. All transcripts from the tapes were analyzed for content describing adherence to treatment factors. Findings: Factors associated with adherence to treatment in hypertensive African American women were in three main categories including: beliefs about hypertension, facilitators of adherence to treatment, and barriers to adherence to treatment. Implications: The study supports the need for education on managing hypertension and medication side effects, early screening for depression in hypertensive African Americans, development of culturally sensitive hypertension educational material, and formation of support groups for promoting adherence to treatment among African American women with hypertension.",
keywords = "Adherence, African American, Hypertension treatment factors",
author = "Fongwa, {Marie N.} and Lorraine Evangelista and Hays, {Ron D.} and Martins, {David S.} and David Elashoff and Cowan, {Marie J.} and Morisky, {Donald E.}",
year = "2008",
month = "4",
day = "7",
doi = "10.2147/vhrm.2008.04.01.157",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "4",
pages = "157--166",
journal = "Vascular Health and Risk Management",
issn = "1176-6344",
publisher = "Dove Medical Press Ltd.",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Adherence treatment factors in hypertensive African American women

AU - Fongwa, Marie N.

AU - Evangelista, Lorraine

AU - Hays, Ron D.

AU - Martins, David S.

AU - Elashoff, David

AU - Cowan, Marie J.

AU - Morisky, Donald E.

PY - 2008/4/7

Y1 - 2008/4/7

N2 - Background: Hypertension among African American women is of epidemic proportions. Nonadherence to treatment contributes to uncontrolled blood pressure in this population. Factors associated with adherence to treatment in African American women are unknown. The purpose of this study was to identify factors associated with adherence to hypertension treatment in African American women. Methods: Five audio-taped focus groups were conducted with hypertensive African American women, 35 years and older receiving treatment for hypertension from an inner-city free clinic. All transcripts from the tapes were analyzed for content describing adherence to treatment factors. Findings: Factors associated with adherence to treatment in hypertensive African American women were in three main categories including: beliefs about hypertension, facilitators of adherence to treatment, and barriers to adherence to treatment. Implications: The study supports the need for education on managing hypertension and medication side effects, early screening for depression in hypertensive African Americans, development of culturally sensitive hypertension educational material, and formation of support groups for promoting adherence to treatment among African American women with hypertension.

AB - Background: Hypertension among African American women is of epidemic proportions. Nonadherence to treatment contributes to uncontrolled blood pressure in this population. Factors associated with adherence to treatment in African American women are unknown. The purpose of this study was to identify factors associated with adherence to hypertension treatment in African American women. Methods: Five audio-taped focus groups were conducted with hypertensive African American women, 35 years and older receiving treatment for hypertension from an inner-city free clinic. All transcripts from the tapes were analyzed for content describing adherence to treatment factors. Findings: Factors associated with adherence to treatment in hypertensive African American women were in three main categories including: beliefs about hypertension, facilitators of adherence to treatment, and barriers to adherence to treatment. Implications: The study supports the need for education on managing hypertension and medication side effects, early screening for depression in hypertensive African Americans, development of culturally sensitive hypertension educational material, and formation of support groups for promoting adherence to treatment among African American women with hypertension.

KW - Adherence

KW - African American

KW - Hypertension treatment factors

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=41549094985&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=41549094985&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.2147/vhrm.2008.04.01.157

DO - 10.2147/vhrm.2008.04.01.157

M3 - Article

VL - 4

SP - 157

EP - 166

JO - Vascular Health and Risk Management

JF - Vascular Health and Risk Management

SN - 1176-6344

IS - 1

ER -