Age of onset for physical and sexual teen dating violence perpetration

A longitudinal investigation

Ryan C. Shorey, Joseph R. Cohen, Yu Lu, Paula J. Fite, Gregory L. Stuart, Jeffrey Temple

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Teen dating violence (TDV) is a serious and prevalent public health problem. TDV is associated with a number of negative health consequences for victims and predicts violence in adult relationships. Thus, efforts should be devoted to the primary prevention of TDV. However, only a few studies have examined when the risk for the first occurrence of TDV is greatest. Continued research in this area would inform the timing of, as well as developmentally appropriate strategies for, TDV primary prevention efforts. The current study examined at which age(s) the risk for TDV perpetration onset was greatest. Utilizing a panel-based design, a sample of racially/ethnically diverse high school students (N = 872; 56% female) from the Southwestern United States completed self-report surveys on physical and sexual TDV perpetration annually for six years (2010 to 2016). Findings suggested that the physical TDV risk of onset was at or before ages 15 to 16 for females and at or before age 18 for males. For sexual TDV perpetration, risk was similar for males and females during adolescence, before uniquely increasing for males, and not females in emerging adulthood. Findings highlight the need for TDV primary prevention programs to be implemented early in high school, and potentially in middle school.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)275-279
Number of pages5
JournalPreventive Medicine
Volume105
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2017

Fingerprint

Age of Onset
Primary Prevention
Intimate Partner Violence
Southwestern United States
Violence
Self Report
Public Health
Students
Health

Keywords

  • Adolescence
  • Prevention
  • Survival analysis
  • Teen dating violence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Age of onset for physical and sexual teen dating violence perpetration : A longitudinal investigation. / Shorey, Ryan C.; Cohen, Joseph R.; Lu, Yu; Fite, Paula J.; Stuart, Gregory L.; Temple, Jeffrey.

In: Preventive Medicine, Vol. 105, 01.12.2017, p. 275-279.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Shorey, Ryan C. ; Cohen, Joseph R. ; Lu, Yu ; Fite, Paula J. ; Stuart, Gregory L. ; Temple, Jeffrey. / Age of onset for physical and sexual teen dating violence perpetration : A longitudinal investigation. In: Preventive Medicine. 2017 ; Vol. 105. pp. 275-279.
@article{158dbbc932c24f2a87bfb465a0c740a8,
title = "Age of onset for physical and sexual teen dating violence perpetration: A longitudinal investigation",
abstract = "Teen dating violence (TDV) is a serious and prevalent public health problem. TDV is associated with a number of negative health consequences for victims and predicts violence in adult relationships. Thus, efforts should be devoted to the primary prevention of TDV. However, only a few studies have examined when the risk for the first occurrence of TDV is greatest. Continued research in this area would inform the timing of, as well as developmentally appropriate strategies for, TDV primary prevention efforts. The current study examined at which age(s) the risk for TDV perpetration onset was greatest. Utilizing a panel-based design, a sample of racially/ethnically diverse high school students (N = 872; 56{\%} female) from the Southwestern United States completed self-report surveys on physical and sexual TDV perpetration annually for six years (2010 to 2016). Findings suggested that the physical TDV risk of onset was at or before ages 15 to 16 for females and at or before age 18 for males. For sexual TDV perpetration, risk was similar for males and females during adolescence, before uniquely increasing for males, and not females in emerging adulthood. Findings highlight the need for TDV primary prevention programs to be implemented early in high school, and potentially in middle school.",
keywords = "Adolescence, Prevention, Survival analysis, Teen dating violence",
author = "Shorey, {Ryan C.} and Cohen, {Joseph R.} and Yu Lu and Fite, {Paula J.} and Stuart, {Gregory L.} and Jeffrey Temple",
year = "2017",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.ypmed.2017.10.008",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "105",
pages = "275--279",
journal = "Preventive Medicine",
issn = "0091-7435",
publisher = "Academic Press Inc.",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Age of onset for physical and sexual teen dating violence perpetration

T2 - A longitudinal investigation

AU - Shorey, Ryan C.

AU - Cohen, Joseph R.

AU - Lu, Yu

AU - Fite, Paula J.

AU - Stuart, Gregory L.

AU - Temple, Jeffrey

PY - 2017/12/1

Y1 - 2017/12/1

N2 - Teen dating violence (TDV) is a serious and prevalent public health problem. TDV is associated with a number of negative health consequences for victims and predicts violence in adult relationships. Thus, efforts should be devoted to the primary prevention of TDV. However, only a few studies have examined when the risk for the first occurrence of TDV is greatest. Continued research in this area would inform the timing of, as well as developmentally appropriate strategies for, TDV primary prevention efforts. The current study examined at which age(s) the risk for TDV perpetration onset was greatest. Utilizing a panel-based design, a sample of racially/ethnically diverse high school students (N = 872; 56% female) from the Southwestern United States completed self-report surveys on physical and sexual TDV perpetration annually for six years (2010 to 2016). Findings suggested that the physical TDV risk of onset was at or before ages 15 to 16 for females and at or before age 18 for males. For sexual TDV perpetration, risk was similar for males and females during adolescence, before uniquely increasing for males, and not females in emerging adulthood. Findings highlight the need for TDV primary prevention programs to be implemented early in high school, and potentially in middle school.

AB - Teen dating violence (TDV) is a serious and prevalent public health problem. TDV is associated with a number of negative health consequences for victims and predicts violence in adult relationships. Thus, efforts should be devoted to the primary prevention of TDV. However, only a few studies have examined when the risk for the first occurrence of TDV is greatest. Continued research in this area would inform the timing of, as well as developmentally appropriate strategies for, TDV primary prevention efforts. The current study examined at which age(s) the risk for TDV perpetration onset was greatest. Utilizing a panel-based design, a sample of racially/ethnically diverse high school students (N = 872; 56% female) from the Southwestern United States completed self-report surveys on physical and sexual TDV perpetration annually for six years (2010 to 2016). Findings suggested that the physical TDV risk of onset was at or before ages 15 to 16 for females and at or before age 18 for males. For sexual TDV perpetration, risk was similar for males and females during adolescence, before uniquely increasing for males, and not females in emerging adulthood. Findings highlight the need for TDV primary prevention programs to be implemented early in high school, and potentially in middle school.

KW - Adolescence

KW - Prevention

KW - Survival analysis

KW - Teen dating violence

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85030777005&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85030777005&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.ypmed.2017.10.008

DO - 10.1016/j.ypmed.2017.10.008

M3 - Article

VL - 105

SP - 275

EP - 279

JO - Preventive Medicine

JF - Preventive Medicine

SN - 0091-7435

ER -