Airway function after cyclooxygenase inhibition during hyperpnea-induced bronchoconstriction in guinea pigs

Oscar Suman, J. D. Morrow, K. A. O'Malley, K. C. Beck

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Airway function deteriorates significantly on cessation of exercise or isocapnic hyperventilation challenges but is largely preserved during the challenge in humans and guinea pigs. PGE2, an endogenous bronchodilator, might be responsible for the preservation of lung function during hyperventilation (HV). We hypothesized that PGE2 might have a protective effect during HV, partially explaining the minimal changes in respiratory system resistance (Rrs) usually seen during HV in humans and guinea pigs. Therefore, changes in Rrs were measured during and after HV in anesthetized, mechanically ventilated guinea pigs treated with flurbiprofen (FBN) or placebo. With HV, there was an initial bronchodilation that was unaffected by FBN. Rrs then increased with time during HV, an effect that was blocked by FBN. After HV, Rrs increased further in all groups, but the increase in Rrs was less in the FBN-treated groups. FBN treatment reduced the PGE2 concentration slightly in lung lavage fluid compared with placebo. We found no enhancement or refractoriness of the Rrs response to repeat bouts of HV and no effect of FBN treatment on the response of Rrs to repeat HV. These results suggest that a constrictor PG is released during and possibly after HV and that the post-HV increase in Rrs is the sum of effects of the PG released during HV and a second constrictor mechanism operating after HV. We found no evidence for bronchodilator PG during or after HV in the guinea pig.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1971-1978
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Applied Physiology
Volume89
Issue number5
StatePublished - 2000

Fingerprint

Bronchoconstriction
Hyperventilation
Prostaglandin-Endoperoxide Synthases
Guinea Pigs
Flurbiprofen
Respiratory System
Dinoprostone
Bronchodilator Agents
Placebos
Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid

Keywords

  • Arachidonic acid
  • Exercise-induced asthma
  • Isocapnic hyperventilation
  • Prostaglandins
  • Respiratory system resistance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Endocrinology
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

Airway function after cyclooxygenase inhibition during hyperpnea-induced bronchoconstriction in guinea pigs. / Suman, Oscar; Morrow, J. D.; O'Malley, K. A.; Beck, K. C.

In: Journal of Applied Physiology, Vol. 89, No. 5, 2000, p. 1971-1978.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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