Allergy testing and immunotherapy in an academic otolaryngology practice

A 20-year review

Andrew P. Lane, Harold Pine, Harold C. Pillsbury

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

38 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Allergic disease plays a central role in the clinical practice of otolaryngology. The purpose of this study was to review the 20-year experience of an allergy clinic integrated within an otolaryngology practice at a major academic institution. STUDY DESIGN: We performed a retrospective database review of over 3300 otolaryngology patients referred for allergy skin testing between 1979 and 1999. RESULTS: Approximately 80% of patients referred for allergy testing in our clinic had positive test results, of which 75.7% went on to undergo desensitization. The most common allergen was house dust, with allergies to mites, ragweed, and grass also prevalent. Among current allergy immunotherapy patients, 30.8% have undergone nasal septal, turbinate, and/or endoscopic sinus procedures In addition to allergy management. Nasal obstruction was the symptom most frequently persistent despite immunotherapy and the one most frequently reported to be improved by surgery. CONCLUSIONS: The otolaryngologist-head and neck surgeon is uniquely qualified to perform comprehensive medical and surgical management for patients with complex disease processes involving a component of allergy. We believe that an integrated approach to allergy within an otolaryngology practice optimizes the treatment of such patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)9-15
Number of pages7
JournalOtolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery
Volume124
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2001
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Otolaryngology
Immunotherapy
Hypersensitivity
Ambrosia
Turbinates
Nasal Obstruction
Mites
Poaceae
Dust
Nose
Allergens
Neck
Head
Databases
Skin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

Allergy testing and immunotherapy in an academic otolaryngology practice : A 20-year review. / Lane, Andrew P.; Pine, Harold; Pillsbury, Harold C.

In: Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Vol. 124, No. 1, 2001, p. 9-15.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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