Allostatic load among non-hispanic whites, non-hispanic blacks, and people of mexican origin

Effects of ethnicity, nativity, and acculturation

Mary Peek, Malcolm P. Cutchin, Jennifer J. Salinas, Kristin M. Sheffield, Karl Eschbach, Raymond P. Stowe, James Goodwin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

69 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives. We investigated ethnic differences in allostatic load in a population-based sample of adults living in Texas City, TX, and assessed the effects of nativity and acculturation status on allostatic load among people of Mexican origin. Methods. We used logistic regression models to examine ethnic variations in allostatic load scores among non-Hispanic Whites, non-Hispanic Blacks, and people of Mexican origin. We also examined associations between measures of acculturation and allostatic load scores among people of Mexican origin only. Results. Foreign-born Mexicans were the least likely group to score in the higher allostatic load categories. Among individuals of Mexican origin, US-born Mexican Americans had higher allostatic load scores than foreign-born Mexicans, and acculturation measures did not account for the difference. Conclusions. Our findings expand on recent research from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey with respect to ethnicity and allostatic load. Our results are consistent with the healthy immigrant hypothesis (i.e., newer immigrants are healthier) and the acculturation hypothesis, according to which the longer Mexican immigrants reside in the United States, the greater their likelihood of potentially losing culture-related neaitn-protective etfects.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)940-946
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Public Health
Volume100
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2010

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Allostasis
Acculturation
Logistic Models
Nutrition Surveys

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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Allostatic load among non-hispanic whites, non-hispanic blacks, and people of mexican origin : Effects of ethnicity, nativity, and acculturation. / Peek, Mary; Cutchin, Malcolm P.; Salinas, Jennifer J.; Sheffield, Kristin M.; Eschbach, Karl; Stowe, Raymond P.; Goodwin, James.

In: American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 100, No. 5, 01.05.2010, p. 940-946.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Peek, Mary ; Cutchin, Malcolm P. ; Salinas, Jennifer J. ; Sheffield, Kristin M. ; Eschbach, Karl ; Stowe, Raymond P. ; Goodwin, James. / Allostatic load among non-hispanic whites, non-hispanic blacks, and people of mexican origin : Effects of ethnicity, nativity, and acculturation. In: American Journal of Public Health. 2010 ; Vol. 100, No. 5. pp. 940-946.
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