Altered intestinal chloride transport in cystic fibrosis

H. M. Berschneider, M. R. Knowles, R. G. Azizkhan, R. C. Boucher, N. A. Tobey, R. C. Orlando, D. W. Powell

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

134 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Sodium ion and chloride transport was studied in vitro in small intestinal and colonic tissue from patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) and from non-CF control subjects matched as to age and sex. Normal histological appearance and substantial response to mucosal glucose (5 mM, ileum) or mucosal amiloride (10-5 M, colon) indicated normal tissue viability in both control and CF tissues. Electroneutral NaCl absorption was demonstrated in the small intestine of control subjects and CF patients. Small intestinal and colonic tissues of control subjects responded to four secretagogues (theophylline, 5 mM; prostaglandin E2, 10-6 M; calcium ionophore (A23187), 10-5 M; bethanechol, 5 x 10-5 M), with electrogenic chloride secretion. The tissues of CF patients, however, did not respond to any of the test secretagogues. These studies demonstrate that an abnormality in chloride transport is present in the small intestinal and colonic epithelia of CF patients. Unlike airway epithelia, which secrete chloride in response to Ca ionophore, the intestinal epithelia of CF patients do not respond to either cAMP- or Ca-mediated secretagogues. This abnormality in intestinal electrolyte transport may play a role in the pathogenesis of meconium impactions in CF patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2625-2629
Number of pages5
JournalFASEB Journal
Volume2
Issue number10
StatePublished - 1988
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

cystic fibrosis
Cystic Fibrosis
Chlorides
chlorides
Tissue
ionophores
Intestinal Mucosa
Bethanechol
Calcium Ionophores
Amiloride
bethanechol
epithelium
Ionophores
Theophylline
Dinoprostone
Electrolytes
Tissue Survival
theophylline
Meconium
Ion Transport

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Biochemistry
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Berschneider, H. M., Knowles, M. R., Azizkhan, R. G., Boucher, R. C., Tobey, N. A., Orlando, R. C., & Powell, D. W. (1988). Altered intestinal chloride transport in cystic fibrosis. FASEB Journal, 2(10), 2625-2629.

Altered intestinal chloride transport in cystic fibrosis. / Berschneider, H. M.; Knowles, M. R.; Azizkhan, R. G.; Boucher, R. C.; Tobey, N. A.; Orlando, R. C.; Powell, D. W.

In: FASEB Journal, Vol. 2, No. 10, 1988, p. 2625-2629.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Berschneider, HM, Knowles, MR, Azizkhan, RG, Boucher, RC, Tobey, NA, Orlando, RC & Powell, DW 1988, 'Altered intestinal chloride transport in cystic fibrosis', FASEB Journal, vol. 2, no. 10, pp. 2625-2629.
Berschneider HM, Knowles MR, Azizkhan RG, Boucher RC, Tobey NA, Orlando RC et al. Altered intestinal chloride transport in cystic fibrosis. FASEB Journal. 1988;2(10):2625-2629.
Berschneider, H. M. ; Knowles, M. R. ; Azizkhan, R. G. ; Boucher, R. C. ; Tobey, N. A. ; Orlando, R. C. ; Powell, D. W. / Altered intestinal chloride transport in cystic fibrosis. In: FASEB Journal. 1988 ; Vol. 2, No. 10. pp. 2625-2629.
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