Amino acids at positions 273 and 394 in rabies virus nucleoprotein are important for both evasion of host RIG-I-mediated antiviral response and pathogenicity

Tatsunori Masatani, Naoto Ito, Kenta Shimizu, Yuki Ito, Keisuke Nakagawa, Masako Abe, Satoko Yamaoka, Makoto Sugiyama

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

35 Scopus citations

Abstract

We previously reported that nucleoprotein (N) is related to the different pathogenicities of the virulent rabies virus strain Nishigahara (Ni) and avirulent strain Ni-CE and also that Ni N, but not Ni-CE N, functions to evade retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I)-mediated innate immunity. There are three amino acid differences between Ni and Ni-CE N (at positions 273, 394 and 395), indicating that one of these mutations or a combination of mutations is important for the pathogenicity and evasion of innate immunity. We generated Ni-CE mutants in which the amino acids in Ni-CE N were replaced with those of Ni in all combinations. Among the mutants, CE(NiN273/394) with mutations at positions 273 and 394 evaded activation of RIG-I-mediated signaling most efficiently and also showed the highest pathogenicity. This correlation reinforces the relation between evasion of host RIG-I-mediated innate immunity and pathogenicity of rabies virus.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)168-174
Number of pages7
JournalVirus Research
Volume155
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2011

Keywords

  • Innate immunity
  • Nucleoprotein
  • Pathogenicity
  • Rabies virus
  • Retinoic acid-inducible gene I

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Virology
  • Infectious Diseases

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