An acute bout of whole body passive hyperthermia increases plasma leptin, but does not alter glucose or insulin responses in obese type 2 diabetics and healthy adults

Eric Rivas, Dan E. Newmire, Craig G. Crandall, Philip L. Hooper, Vic Ben-Ezra

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Acute and chronic hyperthermic treatments in diabetic animal models repeatedly improve insulin sensitivity and glycemic control. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that an acute 1 h bout of hyperthermic treatment improves glucose, insulin, and leptin responses to an oral glucose challenge (OGTT) in obese type 2 diabetics and healthy humans. Nine obese (45±7.1% fat mass) type 2 diabetics (T2DM: 50.1±12y, 7.5±1.8% HbA1c) absent of insulin therapy and nine similar aged (41.1±13.7y) healthy non-obese controls (HC: 33.4±7.8% fat mass, P<0.01; 5.3±0.4% HbA1c, P<0.01) participated. Using a randomized design, subjects underwent either a whole body passive hyperthermia treatment via head-out hot water immersion (1 h resting in 39.4±0.4 °C water) that increased internal temperature above baseline by 1.6±0.4 °C or a control resting condition. Twenty-four hours post treatments, a 75 g OGTT was administered to evaluate changes in plasma glucose, insulin, C-peptide, and leptin concentrations. Hyperthermia itself did not alter area under the curve for plasma glucose, insulin, or C-peptide during the OGTT in either group. Fasting absolute and normalized (kg·fat mass) plasma leptin was significantly increased (P<0.01) only after the hyperthermic exposure by 17% in T2DM and 24% in HC groups (P<0.001) when compared to the control condition. These data indicate that an acute hyperthermic treatment does not improve glucose tolerance 24 h post treatment in moderate metabolic controlled obese T2DM or HC individuals.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)26-33
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Thermal Biology
Volume59
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

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Leptin
leptin
fever
Fever
insulin
Insulin
Plasmas
Glucose
glycohemoglobin
glucose
Glucose Tolerance Test
C-Peptide
peptides
glycemic control
Fats
glucose tolerance
Therapeutics
lipids
insulin resistance
Water

Keywords

  • Diabetes
  • Glycemic control
  • Hyperthermia
  • Leptin
  • Obesity
  • Thermal stress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Developmental Biology
  • Biochemistry
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

An acute bout of whole body passive hyperthermia increases plasma leptin, but does not alter glucose or insulin responses in obese type 2 diabetics and healthy adults. / Rivas, Eric; Newmire, Dan E.; Crandall, Craig G.; Hooper, Philip L.; Ben-Ezra, Vic.

In: Journal of Thermal Biology, Vol. 59, 01.07.2016, p. 26-33.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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