An NPY Y1 receptor antagonist unmasks latent sensitization and reveals the contribution of protein kinase A and Epac to chronic inflammatory pain

Weisi Fu, Tyler S. Nelson, Diogo F. Santos, Suzanne Doolen, Javier J.P. Gutierrez, Na Ye, Jia Zhou, Bradley K Taylor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Peripheral inflammation produces a long-lasting latent sensitization of spinal nociceptive neurons, that is, masked by tonic inhibitory controls. We explored mechanisms of latent sensitization with an established four-step approach: (1) induction of inflammation; (2) allow pain hypersensitivity to resolve; (3) interrogate latent sensitization with a channel blocker, mutant mouse, or receptor antagonist; and (4) disrupt compensatory inhibition with a receptor antagonist so as to reinstate pain hypersensitivity. We found that the neuropeptide Y Y1 receptor antagonist BIBO3304 reinstated pain hypersensitivity, indicative of an unmasking of latent sensitization. BIBO3304-evoked reinstatement was not observed in AC1 knockout mice and was prevented with intrathecal co-administration of a pharmacological blocker to the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR), adenylyl cyclase type 1 (AC1), protein kinase A (PKA), transient receptor potential cation channel A1 (TRPA1), channel V1 (TRPV1), or exchange protein activated by cAMP (Epac1 or Epac2). A PKA activator evoked both pain reinstatement and touch-evoked pERK expression in dorsal horn; the former was prevented with intrathecal co-administration of a TRPA1 or TRPV1 blocker. An Epac activator also evoked pain reinstatement and pERK expression. We conclude that PKA and Epac are sufficient to maintain long-lasting latent sensitization of dorsal horn neurons that is kept in remission by the NPY-Y1 receptor system. Furthermore, we have identified and characterized 2 novel molecular signaling pathways in the dorsal horn that drive latent sensitization in the setting of chronic inflammatory pain: NMDAR→AC1→PKA→TRPA1/V1 and NMDAR→AC1→Epac1/2. New treatments for chronic inflammatory pain might either increase endogenous NPY analgesia or inhibit AC1, PKA, or Epac.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1754-1765
Number of pages12
JournalPain
Volume160
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2019

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Cyclic AMP-Dependent Protein Kinases
Chronic Pain
Pain
Transient Receptor Potential Channels
Hypersensitivity
Inflammation
Posterior Horn Cells
Nociceptors
Touch
N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptors
Knockout Mice
Analgesia
neuropeptide Y-Y1 receptor
Pharmacology
adenylyl cyclase 1
Proteins
Spinal Cord Dorsal Horn
BIBO 3304
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

Cite this

An NPY Y1 receptor antagonist unmasks latent sensitization and reveals the contribution of protein kinase A and Epac to chronic inflammatory pain. / Fu, Weisi; Nelson, Tyler S.; Santos, Diogo F.; Doolen, Suzanne; Gutierrez, Javier J.P.; Ye, Na; Zhou, Jia; K Taylor, Bradley.

In: Pain, Vol. 160, No. 8, 01.08.2019, p. 1754-1765.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Fu, Weisi ; Nelson, Tyler S. ; Santos, Diogo F. ; Doolen, Suzanne ; Gutierrez, Javier J.P. ; Ye, Na ; Zhou, Jia ; K Taylor, Bradley. / An NPY Y1 receptor antagonist unmasks latent sensitization and reveals the contribution of protein kinase A and Epac to chronic inflammatory pain. In: Pain. 2019 ; Vol. 160, No. 8. pp. 1754-1765.
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AU - Zhou, Jia

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