An update on human papillomavirus vaccine uptake among 11-17 year old girls in the United States: National Health Interview Survey, 2010

Tabassum H. Laz, Mahbubur Rahman, Abbey Berenson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

84 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: A 3-dose human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine is recommended for adolescents to protect against HPV-related cervical and other cancers. The purpose of this study was to provide an update on HPV vaccine uptake among 11-17 year old girls residing in the US. Methods: Data from the 2010 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) were obtained to assess HPV vaccination status and its correlates. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to examine HPV vaccine uptake of ≥1 dose and ≥3 doses among all girls, and completion of the 3-dose series among those who initiated (received ≥1 dose) the vaccine. Results: Overall, 28.9% and 14.2% received ≥1 dose and ≥3 doses of vaccine: 14.5% and 3.0% among 11-12 year old girls, and 34.8% and 18.7% among 13-17 year olds, respectively. Hispanics had higher uptake of ≥1 dose (odds ratio (OR) 1.63, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.22-2.17) than whites. Having received an influenza shot in the past year and parents' awareness of the vaccine were significantly associated with receiving ≥1 dose (OR 1.88, 95% CI 1.51-2.33 and OR 16.57, 95% CI 10.95-25.06) and ≥3 doses (OR 1.48, 95% CI 1.13-1.92 and OR 10.60, 95% CI 5.95-18.88). A separate multivariate model based on girls who initiated the vaccine did not identify any significant correlates of 3-dose series completion. Among parents of unvaccinated girls, 60% were not interested in vaccinating their daughters and mentioned three main reasons: "does not need vaccine" (25.5%), "worried about safety" (19.3%) and "does not know enough about vaccine" (16.6%). Of those who were interested, 53.7% would pay $360-$500 for the vaccination, while 41.7% preferred to receive it at a much lower cost or free. Conclusions: Only 1 out of 3 girls (11-17 years) have received ≥1 dose of HPV vaccine and much less have completed all 3 doses. Strategies should be taken to improve this vaccine uptake among girls, especially those 11-12 year olds, and to educate parents about the importance of vaccination.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3534-3540
Number of pages7
JournalVaccine
Volume30
Issue number24
DOIs
StatePublished - May 21 2012

Fingerprint

Papillomavirus Vaccines
Papillomaviridae
Health Surveys
interviews
Vaccines
Interviews
vaccines
uptake mechanisms
Odds Ratio
dosage
Confidence Intervals
odds ratio
Vaccination
confidence interval
Parents
vaccination
Nuclear Family
Hispanic Americans
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms
Human Influenza

Keywords

  • Adolescent
  • HPV vaccine
  • Human papillomavirus
  • National Health Interview Survey
  • Vaccination
  • Vaccine uptake

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • veterinary(all)
  • Molecular Medicine

Cite this

An update on human papillomavirus vaccine uptake among 11-17 year old girls in the United States : National Health Interview Survey, 2010. / Laz, Tabassum H.; Rahman, Mahbubur; Berenson, Abbey.

In: Vaccine, Vol. 30, No. 24, 21.05.2012, p. 3534-3540.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{87a4487d3eb6490396ea1f576b5956e8,
title = "An update on human papillomavirus vaccine uptake among 11-17 year old girls in the United States: National Health Interview Survey, 2010",
abstract = "Purpose: A 3-dose human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine is recommended for adolescents to protect against HPV-related cervical and other cancers. The purpose of this study was to provide an update on HPV vaccine uptake among 11-17 year old girls residing in the US. Methods: Data from the 2010 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) were obtained to assess HPV vaccination status and its correlates. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to examine HPV vaccine uptake of ≥1 dose and ≥3 doses among all girls, and completion of the 3-dose series among those who initiated (received ≥1 dose) the vaccine. Results: Overall, 28.9{\%} and 14.2{\%} received ≥1 dose and ≥3 doses of vaccine: 14.5{\%} and 3.0{\%} among 11-12 year old girls, and 34.8{\%} and 18.7{\%} among 13-17 year olds, respectively. Hispanics had higher uptake of ≥1 dose (odds ratio (OR) 1.63, 95{\%} confidence interval (CI) 1.22-2.17) than whites. Having received an influenza shot in the past year and parents' awareness of the vaccine were significantly associated with receiving ≥1 dose (OR 1.88, 95{\%} CI 1.51-2.33 and OR 16.57, 95{\%} CI 10.95-25.06) and ≥3 doses (OR 1.48, 95{\%} CI 1.13-1.92 and OR 10.60, 95{\%} CI 5.95-18.88). A separate multivariate model based on girls who initiated the vaccine did not identify any significant correlates of 3-dose series completion. Among parents of unvaccinated girls, 60{\%} were not interested in vaccinating their daughters and mentioned three main reasons: {"}does not need vaccine{"} (25.5{\%}), {"}worried about safety{"} (19.3{\%}) and {"}does not know enough about vaccine{"} (16.6{\%}). Of those who were interested, 53.7{\%} would pay $360-$500 for the vaccination, while 41.7{\%} preferred to receive it at a much lower cost or free. Conclusions: Only 1 out of 3 girls (11-17 years) have received ≥1 dose of HPV vaccine and much less have completed all 3 doses. Strategies should be taken to improve this vaccine uptake among girls, especially those 11-12 year olds, and to educate parents about the importance of vaccination.",
keywords = "Adolescent, HPV vaccine, Human papillomavirus, National Health Interview Survey, Vaccination, Vaccine uptake",
author = "Laz, {Tabassum H.} and Mahbubur Rahman and Abbey Berenson",
year = "2012",
month = "5",
day = "21",
doi = "10.1016/j.vaccine.2012.03.067",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "30",
pages = "3534--3540",
journal = "Vaccine",
issn = "0264-410X",
publisher = "Elsevier BV",
number = "24",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - An update on human papillomavirus vaccine uptake among 11-17 year old girls in the United States

T2 - National Health Interview Survey, 2010

AU - Laz, Tabassum H.

AU - Rahman, Mahbubur

AU - Berenson, Abbey

PY - 2012/5/21

Y1 - 2012/5/21

N2 - Purpose: A 3-dose human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine is recommended for adolescents to protect against HPV-related cervical and other cancers. The purpose of this study was to provide an update on HPV vaccine uptake among 11-17 year old girls residing in the US. Methods: Data from the 2010 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) were obtained to assess HPV vaccination status and its correlates. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to examine HPV vaccine uptake of ≥1 dose and ≥3 doses among all girls, and completion of the 3-dose series among those who initiated (received ≥1 dose) the vaccine. Results: Overall, 28.9% and 14.2% received ≥1 dose and ≥3 doses of vaccine: 14.5% and 3.0% among 11-12 year old girls, and 34.8% and 18.7% among 13-17 year olds, respectively. Hispanics had higher uptake of ≥1 dose (odds ratio (OR) 1.63, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.22-2.17) than whites. Having received an influenza shot in the past year and parents' awareness of the vaccine were significantly associated with receiving ≥1 dose (OR 1.88, 95% CI 1.51-2.33 and OR 16.57, 95% CI 10.95-25.06) and ≥3 doses (OR 1.48, 95% CI 1.13-1.92 and OR 10.60, 95% CI 5.95-18.88). A separate multivariate model based on girls who initiated the vaccine did not identify any significant correlates of 3-dose series completion. Among parents of unvaccinated girls, 60% were not interested in vaccinating their daughters and mentioned three main reasons: "does not need vaccine" (25.5%), "worried about safety" (19.3%) and "does not know enough about vaccine" (16.6%). Of those who were interested, 53.7% would pay $360-$500 for the vaccination, while 41.7% preferred to receive it at a much lower cost or free. Conclusions: Only 1 out of 3 girls (11-17 years) have received ≥1 dose of HPV vaccine and much less have completed all 3 doses. Strategies should be taken to improve this vaccine uptake among girls, especially those 11-12 year olds, and to educate parents about the importance of vaccination.

AB - Purpose: A 3-dose human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine is recommended for adolescents to protect against HPV-related cervical and other cancers. The purpose of this study was to provide an update on HPV vaccine uptake among 11-17 year old girls residing in the US. Methods: Data from the 2010 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) were obtained to assess HPV vaccination status and its correlates. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to examine HPV vaccine uptake of ≥1 dose and ≥3 doses among all girls, and completion of the 3-dose series among those who initiated (received ≥1 dose) the vaccine. Results: Overall, 28.9% and 14.2% received ≥1 dose and ≥3 doses of vaccine: 14.5% and 3.0% among 11-12 year old girls, and 34.8% and 18.7% among 13-17 year olds, respectively. Hispanics had higher uptake of ≥1 dose (odds ratio (OR) 1.63, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.22-2.17) than whites. Having received an influenza shot in the past year and parents' awareness of the vaccine were significantly associated with receiving ≥1 dose (OR 1.88, 95% CI 1.51-2.33 and OR 16.57, 95% CI 10.95-25.06) and ≥3 doses (OR 1.48, 95% CI 1.13-1.92 and OR 10.60, 95% CI 5.95-18.88). A separate multivariate model based on girls who initiated the vaccine did not identify any significant correlates of 3-dose series completion. Among parents of unvaccinated girls, 60% were not interested in vaccinating their daughters and mentioned three main reasons: "does not need vaccine" (25.5%), "worried about safety" (19.3%) and "does not know enough about vaccine" (16.6%). Of those who were interested, 53.7% would pay $360-$500 for the vaccination, while 41.7% preferred to receive it at a much lower cost or free. Conclusions: Only 1 out of 3 girls (11-17 years) have received ≥1 dose of HPV vaccine and much less have completed all 3 doses. Strategies should be taken to improve this vaccine uptake among girls, especially those 11-12 year olds, and to educate parents about the importance of vaccination.

KW - Adolescent

KW - HPV vaccine

KW - Human papillomavirus

KW - National Health Interview Survey

KW - Vaccination

KW - Vaccine uptake

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84861001629&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84861001629&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.vaccine.2012.03.067

DO - 10.1016/j.vaccine.2012.03.067

M3 - Article

C2 - 22480927

AN - SCOPUS:84861001629

VL - 30

SP - 3534

EP - 3540

JO - Vaccine

JF - Vaccine

SN - 0264-410X

IS - 24

ER -