An Updated Epidemiology of Foot and Ankle Fractures in the United States: Complications, Mechanisms, and Risk Factors

Regina Hansen, Naohiro Shibuya, Daniel C. Jupiter

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Foot and ankle fractures are prevalent emergent injuries, about which there remains a lack of in-depth epidemiological information. This analysis of the epidemiology of foot and ankle injuries in the United States updates a previously conducted study. Data from the National Trauma Data Bank (2012-2017) were used for analysis. Demographic variables, mechanism of injuries, and comorbidities were analyzed to determine risk factors for complications after foot and ankle injuries. Young adults aged 21 to 30 years had the highest injury rates; however, in general, older individuals were more at risk for complications. Black individuals were more at risk for certain complications, while Asians were at lower risk, when compared to White individuals. The comorbidities of bleeding disorders, diabetes, smoking, hypertension, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease all increased risk of at least 1 complication. In terms of mechanism, traffic incidents were found to be the most strongly associated with complications.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1034-1038
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Foot and Ankle Surgery
Volume61
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2022

Keywords

  • 3
  • ankle fractures
  • ankle injuries
  • epidemiological factors
  • foot injuries
  • postoperative complications
  • risk factors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'An Updated Epidemiology of Foot and Ankle Fractures in the United States: Complications, Mechanisms, and Risk Factors'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this