Analysis of pulmonary microvascular permeability after smoke inhalation

T. Isago, S. Noshima, L. D. Traber, David Herndon, D. L. Traber

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

62 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We estimated the reflection (σ) and filtration coefficients (K(f)) in a chronic sheep lung lymphatic preparation after smoke inhalation. Group I (n = 7) sheep were insufflated with cotton smoke and group II animals (n = 5) with room air. After inhalation injury, the lung lymph flow increased nearly four times the baseline value by 24 h after injury. There was a concomitant reduction of σ (0.81 ± 0.02 to 0.64 ± 0.02) and elevation of K(f) (0.020 ± 0.002 to 0.042 ± 0.009 ml · min-1 · mmHg-1); pulmonary capillary pressure was also elevated (13 ± 1 to 17 ± 1 mmHg). By 48 h postinjury, σ and K(f) returned toward baseline but pulmonary capillary pressure was still elevated. We determined that 34% of the increase in capillary filtration was attributable to increased capillary pressure and 66% to increased permeability 24 h after inhalation, but 48 h after injury, 75% of the increase in capillary filtration was attributable to increased capillary pressure and 25% to increased permeability. We conclude that the lung edema formation following smoke inhalation is the result of marked increases in both capillary pressure and permeability.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1403-1408
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Applied Physiology
Volume71
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1991

Fingerprint

Capillary Permeability
Smoke
Inhalation
Lung
Pressure
Permeability
Sheep
Wounds and Injuries
Lymph
Edema
Air

Keywords

  • filtration coefficient
  • pulmonary capillary pressure
  • pulmonary venous occluders
  • reflection coefficient

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Endocrinology
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

Isago, T., Noshima, S., Traber, L. D., Herndon, D., & Traber, D. L. (1991). Analysis of pulmonary microvascular permeability after smoke inhalation. Journal of Applied Physiology, 71(4), 1403-1408.

Analysis of pulmonary microvascular permeability after smoke inhalation. / Isago, T.; Noshima, S.; Traber, L. D.; Herndon, David; Traber, D. L.

In: Journal of Applied Physiology, Vol. 71, No. 4, 1991, p. 1403-1408.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Isago, T, Noshima, S, Traber, LD, Herndon, D & Traber, DL 1991, 'Analysis of pulmonary microvascular permeability after smoke inhalation', Journal of Applied Physiology, vol. 71, no. 4, pp. 1403-1408.
Isago T, Noshima S, Traber LD, Herndon D, Traber DL. Analysis of pulmonary microvascular permeability after smoke inhalation. Journal of Applied Physiology. 1991;71(4):1403-1408.
Isago, T. ; Noshima, S. ; Traber, L. D. ; Herndon, David ; Traber, D. L. / Analysis of pulmonary microvascular permeability after smoke inhalation. In: Journal of Applied Physiology. 1991 ; Vol. 71, No. 4. pp. 1403-1408.
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