Antibody-dependent enhancement of Ebola virus infection

Ayato Takada, Heinz Feldmann, Thomas Ksiazek, Yoshihiro Kawaoka

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

98 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Most strains of Ebola virus cause a rapidly fatal hemorrhagic disease in humans, yet there are still no biologic explanations that adequately account for the extreme virulence of these emerging pathogens. Here we show that Ebola Zaire virus infection in humans induces antibodies that enhance viral infectivity. Plasma or serum from convalescing patients enhanced the infection of primate kidney cells by the Zaire virus, and this enhancement was mediated by antibodies to the viral glycoprotein and by complement component C1q. Our results suggest a novel mechanism of antibody-dependent enhancement of Ebola virus infection, one that would account for the dire outcome of Ebola outbreaks in human populations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)7539-7544
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Virology
Volume77
Issue number13
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2003
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Ebola Hemorrhagic Fever
Antibody-Dependent Enhancement
Ebolavirus
Zaire Ebola virus
Viral Antibodies
Democratic Republic of the Congo
antibodies
Complement C1q
infection
kidney cells
human diseases
human population
Primates
Disease Outbreaks
Virulence
glycoproteins
Glycoproteins
complement
virulence
pathogenicity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

Cite this

Antibody-dependent enhancement of Ebola virus infection. / Takada, Ayato; Feldmann, Heinz; Ksiazek, Thomas; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro.

In: Journal of Virology, Vol. 77, No. 13, 07.2003, p. 7539-7544.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Takada, Ayato ; Feldmann, Heinz ; Ksiazek, Thomas ; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro. / Antibody-dependent enhancement of Ebola virus infection. In: Journal of Virology. 2003 ; Vol. 77, No. 13. pp. 7539-7544.
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