Aponomma hydrosauri, the reptile-associated tick reservoir of Rickettsia honei on Flinders Island, Australia.

John Stenos, Stephen Graves, Vsevolod Popov, David Walker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

47 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Rickettsia honei is the etiologic agent of Flinders Island (Australia) spotted fever. The tick Aponomma hydrosauri is associated with reptiles and is the arthropod reservoir for this rickettsia on Flinders Island. The rickettsia appears to be maintained in the tick via vertical transmission. Of 46 ticks examined, 29 (63%) were positive for spotted fever group rickettsiae by detection of the citrate synthase gene by a polymerase chain reaction (PCR). From the positive tick samples, seven were sequenced and found to be 100% homologous with R. honei. Of 17 reptiles examined, none had evidence of rickettsiae by PCR or culture of blood.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)314-317
Number of pages4
JournalThe American journal of tropical medicine and hygiene
Volume69
Issue number3
StatePublished - Sep 2003
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Rickettsia
Reptiles
Ticks
Islands
Fever
Citrate (si)-Synthase
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Arthropods
Genes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Parasitology
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

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abstract = "Rickettsia honei is the etiologic agent of Flinders Island (Australia) spotted fever. The tick Aponomma hydrosauri is associated with reptiles and is the arthropod reservoir for this rickettsia on Flinders Island. The rickettsia appears to be maintained in the tick via vertical transmission. Of 46 ticks examined, 29 (63{\%}) were positive for spotted fever group rickettsiae by detection of the citrate synthase gene by a polymerase chain reaction (PCR). From the positive tick samples, seven were sequenced and found to be 100{\%} homologous with R. honei. Of 17 reptiles examined, none had evidence of rickettsiae by PCR or culture of blood.",
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AU - Graves, Stephen

AU - Popov, Vsevolod

AU - Walker, David

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