Appreciating force and shape-the rise of mechanotransduction in cell biology

Thomas Iskratsch, Haguy Wolfenson, Michael Sheetz

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

237 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although the shapes of organisms are encoded in their genome, the developmental processes that lead to the final form of vertebrates involve a constant feedback between dynamic mechanical forces, and cell growth and motility. Mechanobiology has emerged as a discipline dedicated to the study of the effects of mechanical forces and geometry on cell growth and motility-for example, during cell-matrix adhesion development-through the signalling process of mechanotransduction.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)825-833
Number of pages9
JournalNature Reviews Molecular Cell Biology
Volume15
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 11 2014
Externally publishedYes

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Cell Movement
Cell Biology
Cell-Matrix Junctions
Biophysics
Growth
Vertebrates
Genome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Appreciating force and shape-the rise of mechanotransduction in cell biology. / Iskratsch, Thomas; Wolfenson, Haguy; Sheetz, Michael.

In: Nature Reviews Molecular Cell Biology, Vol. 15, No. 12, 11.12.2014, p. 825-833.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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