Approved IFCC recommendation on reporting results for blood glucose

Paul D'Orazio, Robert W. Burnett, Niels Fogh-Andersen, Ellis Jacobs, Katsuhiko Kuwa, Wolf R. Külpmann, Lasse Larsson, Andrzej Lewenstam, Anton H J Maas, Gerhard Mager, Jerzy W. Naskalski, Anthony Okorodudu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

In current clinical practice, plasma and blood glucose are used interchangeably with a consequent risk of clinical misinterpretation. In human blood, glucose is distributed, like water, between erythrocytes and plasma. The molality of glucose (amount of glucose per unit water mass) is the same throughout the sample, but the concentration is higher in plasma, because the concentration of water and therefore glucose is higher in plasma than in erythrocytes. Different devices for the measurement of glucose may detect and report fundamentally different quantities. Different water concentrations in the calibrator, plasma, and erythrocyte fluid can explain some of the differences. Results for glucose measurements depend on the sample type and on whether the method requires sample dilution or uses biosensors in undiluted samples. If the results are mixed up or used indiscriminately, the differences may exceed the maximum allowable error for glucose determinations for diagnosing and monitoring diabetes mellitus, thus complicating patient treatment. The goal of the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine, Scientific Division, Working Group on Selective Electrodes and Point of Care Testing (IFCC-SD-WG-SEPOCT) is to reach a global consensus on reporting results. The document recommends reporting the concentration of glucose in plasma (in the unit mmol/L), irrespective of sample type or measurement technique. A constant factor of 1.11 is used to convert concentration in whole blood to the equivalent concentration in plasma. The conversion will provide harmonized results, facilitating the classification and care of patients and leading to fewer therapeutic misjudgments.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1486-1490
Number of pages5
JournalClinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine
Volume44
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2006

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Blood Glucose
Plasmas
Glucose
Water
Erythrocytes
Clinical laboratories
Patient treatment
Clinical Chemistry
Medical problems
Biosensors
Biosensing Techniques
Dilution
Medicine
Blood
Patient Care
Diabetes Mellitus
Electrodes
Fluids
Monitoring
Equipment and Supplies

Keywords

  • Activity
  • Biosensors
  • Glucose oxidase
  • Hematocrit
  • Plasma vs. whole blood
  • Standardization
  • Water concentration

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Biochemistry

Cite this

D'Orazio, P., Burnett, R. W., Fogh-Andersen, N., Jacobs, E., Kuwa, K., Külpmann, W. R., ... Okorodudu, A. (2006). Approved IFCC recommendation on reporting results for blood glucose. Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine, 44(12), 1486-1490. https://doi.org/10.1515/CCLM.2006.275

Approved IFCC recommendation on reporting results for blood glucose. / D'Orazio, Paul; Burnett, Robert W.; Fogh-Andersen, Niels; Jacobs, Ellis; Kuwa, Katsuhiko; Külpmann, Wolf R.; Larsson, Lasse; Lewenstam, Andrzej; Maas, Anton H J; Mager, Gerhard; Naskalski, Jerzy W.; Okorodudu, Anthony.

In: Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine, Vol. 44, No. 12, 01.12.2006, p. 1486-1490.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

D'Orazio, P, Burnett, RW, Fogh-Andersen, N, Jacobs, E, Kuwa, K, Külpmann, WR, Larsson, L, Lewenstam, A, Maas, AHJ, Mager, G, Naskalski, JW & Okorodudu, A 2006, 'Approved IFCC recommendation on reporting results for blood glucose', Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine, vol. 44, no. 12, pp. 1486-1490. https://doi.org/10.1515/CCLM.2006.275
D'Orazio P, Burnett RW, Fogh-Andersen N, Jacobs E, Kuwa K, Külpmann WR et al. Approved IFCC recommendation on reporting results for blood glucose. Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine. 2006 Dec 1;44(12):1486-1490. https://doi.org/10.1515/CCLM.2006.275
D'Orazio, Paul ; Burnett, Robert W. ; Fogh-Andersen, Niels ; Jacobs, Ellis ; Kuwa, Katsuhiko ; Külpmann, Wolf R. ; Larsson, Lasse ; Lewenstam, Andrzej ; Maas, Anton H J ; Mager, Gerhard ; Naskalski, Jerzy W. ; Okorodudu, Anthony. / Approved IFCC recommendation on reporting results for blood glucose. In: Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine. 2006 ; Vol. 44, No. 12. pp. 1486-1490.
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