Are pregnant adolescents stigmatized by pregnancy?

Constance M. Wiemann, Vaughn I. Rickert, Abbey Berenson, Robert J. Volk

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

63 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To identify prevalence and correlates, including substance use and exposure to violence, of feeling stigmatized by being pregnant as an adolescent. Methods: A total of 925 low-income African-American, Mexican-American, and Caucasian pregnant adolescents aged ≤ 18 years were interviewed on the postpartum ward of a university hospital within 48 hours of delivery. Correlates of stigma were identified among self-reported behaviors such as substance use, exposure to violence, family support and criticism, as well as reproductive and sociodemographic characteristics. Results: Two out of five adolescents (39.1%) reported feeling stigmatized by their pregnancy. As compared with their nonstigmatized peers, stigmatized adolescents were more likely to report having seriously considered abortion, being afraid to tell parents about pregnancy, feeling that parents/teachers thought pregnancy a mistake, and feeling abandoned by the fathers of their babies. Stepwise logistic regression revealed the following correlates independently associated with feeling stigmatized: white race/ethnicity, not being legally/common-law married or engaged to the baby's father, feelings of social isolation, aspirations to complete college, experiencing verbal abuse or being fearful of being hurt by other teenagers, and experiencing family criticism. In contrast, greater self-esteem and having dropped out of school before conception were protective of reporting feelings of stigma. Conclusions: Significant proportions of pregnant adolescents feel stigmatized by pregnancy and are at increased risk of social isolation and abuse. These young women may need special attention during and after pregnancy to develop concrete strategies to care for themselves and their children to complete their education and avoid becoming clinically depressed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Adolescent Health
Volume36
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2005

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Pregnancy in Adolescence
Emotions
Pregnancy
Social Isolation
Fathers
Parents
Self Concept
African Americans
Postpartum Period
Logistic Models
Education

Keywords

  • Adolescent mothers
  • Adolescent pregnancy
  • Stigma
  • Violence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Are pregnant adolescents stigmatized by pregnancy? / Wiemann, Constance M.; Rickert, Vaughn I.; Berenson, Abbey; Volk, Robert J.

In: Journal of Adolescent Health, Vol. 36, No. 4, 04.2005.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wiemann, Constance M. ; Rickert, Vaughn I. ; Berenson, Abbey ; Volk, Robert J. / Are pregnant adolescents stigmatized by pregnancy?. In: Journal of Adolescent Health. 2005 ; Vol. 36, No. 4.
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