Arthritides caused by mosquito-borne viruses.

R. B. Tesh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

103 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Five different mosquito-borne viruses (chikungunya, o'nyong-nyong, Mayaro, Ross River, and Sindbis) have been associated with arthritis in humans. These agents occur most commonly in the tropics and subtropics. The symptoms they produce are similar and typically consist of fever, arthralgia, and rash. In general, the symptoms are of short duration (less than one week) and recovery is complete, although some patients have recurrent episodes of joint swelling and tenderness for months after infection. Treatment is symptomatic. There are no vaccines currently available; the best prevention is to avoid mosquito bites when traveling or living in areas where these diseases occur.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)31-40
Number of pages10
JournalAnnual Review of Medicine
Volume33
StatePublished - 1982
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Tropics
Culicidae
Viruses
Arthritis
Swelling
Vaccines
Rivers
Chikungunya virus
Recovery
Arthralgia
Bites and Stings
Exanthema
Fever
Joints
Infection
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Arthritides caused by mosquito-borne viruses. / Tesh, R. B.

In: Annual Review of Medicine, Vol. 33, 1982, p. 31-40.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Tesh, R. B. / Arthritides caused by mosquito-borne viruses. In: Annual Review of Medicine. 1982 ; Vol. 33. pp. 31-40.
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