Assessing group identity in a mars simulation environment

Sheryl L. Bishop, Kate Reynolds, Rachael Eggins, Steve Dawson, Nishi Rawat, Kelly Bunzelek

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Introduction: Data on teams rotating through the Mars Desert Research Station across four seasons (2003-2006) explored the formation of group identification and its relationship with personality and achievement profiles, group goals and group and personal functioning (i.e., stress). This paper examines the utility of an investigator developed assessment of group identity and its relationship with established personality and achievement measures. Methods: Teams were asked to complete a questionnaire dealing with social identity and group organization on multiple occasions throughout the mission in addition to the AstroPCI personality inventory. Results: Psychometric analyses indicate a stable core of group identity items relating to superordinate identity, goal sharing, and organizational behavior that seem to differentiate between groups and demonstrate a pattern of significant relationships with several key personality factors. Analyses were conducted at both the group (team and gender) level and by pooling all participants across seasons to maximize subject size. Conclusions: The evidence from five teams across four mission seasons indicates that the present instrument is moderately successful in its assessment goals. However there are also indications of counterintuitive relationships that cannot be adequately explained with the current small sample. Continued development of the instrument needs to pay attention to sensitivity and specificity as well as the impact of mediator variables such as culture, gender and team structure. Establishing a valid and reliable assessment instrument of group identity will vastly improve insight into group dynamics.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAIAA 57th International Astronautical Congress, IAC 2006
Pages1-13
Number of pages13
Volume1
StatePublished - 2006
EventAIAA 57th International Astronautical Congress, IAC 2006 - Valencia, Spain
Duration: Oct 2 2006Oct 6 2006

Other

OtherAIAA 57th International Astronautical Congress, IAC 2006
CountrySpain
CityValencia
Period10/2/0610/6/06

Fingerprint

environment simulation
mars
Mars
personality
gender
simulation
desert
group dynamics
psychometrics
deserts
indication
stations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Space and Planetary Science
  • Aerospace Engineering

Cite this

Bishop, S. L., Reynolds, K., Eggins, R., Dawson, S., Rawat, N., & Bunzelek, K. (2006). Assessing group identity in a mars simulation environment. In AIAA 57th International Astronautical Congress, IAC 2006 (Vol. 1, pp. 1-13)

Assessing group identity in a mars simulation environment. / Bishop, Sheryl L.; Reynolds, Kate; Eggins, Rachael; Dawson, Steve; Rawat, Nishi; Bunzelek, Kelly.

AIAA 57th International Astronautical Congress, IAC 2006. Vol. 1 2006. p. 1-13.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Bishop, SL, Reynolds, K, Eggins, R, Dawson, S, Rawat, N & Bunzelek, K 2006, Assessing group identity in a mars simulation environment. in AIAA 57th International Astronautical Congress, IAC 2006. vol. 1, pp. 1-13, AIAA 57th International Astronautical Congress, IAC 2006, Valencia, Spain, 10/2/06.
Bishop SL, Reynolds K, Eggins R, Dawson S, Rawat N, Bunzelek K. Assessing group identity in a mars simulation environment. In AIAA 57th International Astronautical Congress, IAC 2006. Vol. 1. 2006. p. 1-13
Bishop, Sheryl L. ; Reynolds, Kate ; Eggins, Rachael ; Dawson, Steve ; Rawat, Nishi ; Bunzelek, Kelly. / Assessing group identity in a mars simulation environment. AIAA 57th International Astronautical Congress, IAC 2006. Vol. 1 2006. pp. 1-13
@inproceedings{57ea933cb04d4a599affb68abb183e1a,
title = "Assessing group identity in a mars simulation environment",
abstract = "Introduction: Data on teams rotating through the Mars Desert Research Station across four seasons (2003-2006) explored the formation of group identification and its relationship with personality and achievement profiles, group goals and group and personal functioning (i.e., stress). This paper examines the utility of an investigator developed assessment of group identity and its relationship with established personality and achievement measures. Methods: Teams were asked to complete a questionnaire dealing with social identity and group organization on multiple occasions throughout the mission in addition to the AstroPCI personality inventory. Results: Psychometric analyses indicate a stable core of group identity items relating to superordinate identity, goal sharing, and organizational behavior that seem to differentiate between groups and demonstrate a pattern of significant relationships with several key personality factors. Analyses were conducted at both the group (team and gender) level and by pooling all participants across seasons to maximize subject size. Conclusions: The evidence from five teams across four mission seasons indicates that the present instrument is moderately successful in its assessment goals. However there are also indications of counterintuitive relationships that cannot be adequately explained with the current small sample. Continued development of the instrument needs to pay attention to sensitivity and specificity as well as the impact of mediator variables such as culture, gender and team structure. Establishing a valid and reliable assessment instrument of group identity will vastly improve insight into group dynamics.",
author = "Bishop, {Sheryl L.} and Kate Reynolds and Rachael Eggins and Steve Dawson and Nishi Rawat and Kelly Bunzelek",
year = "2006",
language = "English (US)",
isbn = "9781605600390",
volume = "1",
pages = "1--13",
booktitle = "AIAA 57th International Astronautical Congress, IAC 2006",

}

TY - GEN

T1 - Assessing group identity in a mars simulation environment

AU - Bishop, Sheryl L.

AU - Reynolds, Kate

AU - Eggins, Rachael

AU - Dawson, Steve

AU - Rawat, Nishi

AU - Bunzelek, Kelly

PY - 2006

Y1 - 2006

N2 - Introduction: Data on teams rotating through the Mars Desert Research Station across four seasons (2003-2006) explored the formation of group identification and its relationship with personality and achievement profiles, group goals and group and personal functioning (i.e., stress). This paper examines the utility of an investigator developed assessment of group identity and its relationship with established personality and achievement measures. Methods: Teams were asked to complete a questionnaire dealing with social identity and group organization on multiple occasions throughout the mission in addition to the AstroPCI personality inventory. Results: Psychometric analyses indicate a stable core of group identity items relating to superordinate identity, goal sharing, and organizational behavior that seem to differentiate between groups and demonstrate a pattern of significant relationships with several key personality factors. Analyses were conducted at both the group (team and gender) level and by pooling all participants across seasons to maximize subject size. Conclusions: The evidence from five teams across four mission seasons indicates that the present instrument is moderately successful in its assessment goals. However there are also indications of counterintuitive relationships that cannot be adequately explained with the current small sample. Continued development of the instrument needs to pay attention to sensitivity and specificity as well as the impact of mediator variables such as culture, gender and team structure. Establishing a valid and reliable assessment instrument of group identity will vastly improve insight into group dynamics.

AB - Introduction: Data on teams rotating through the Mars Desert Research Station across four seasons (2003-2006) explored the formation of group identification and its relationship with personality and achievement profiles, group goals and group and personal functioning (i.e., stress). This paper examines the utility of an investigator developed assessment of group identity and its relationship with established personality and achievement measures. Methods: Teams were asked to complete a questionnaire dealing with social identity and group organization on multiple occasions throughout the mission in addition to the AstroPCI personality inventory. Results: Psychometric analyses indicate a stable core of group identity items relating to superordinate identity, goal sharing, and organizational behavior that seem to differentiate between groups and demonstrate a pattern of significant relationships with several key personality factors. Analyses were conducted at both the group (team and gender) level and by pooling all participants across seasons to maximize subject size. Conclusions: The evidence from five teams across four mission seasons indicates that the present instrument is moderately successful in its assessment goals. However there are also indications of counterintuitive relationships that cannot be adequately explained with the current small sample. Continued development of the instrument needs to pay attention to sensitivity and specificity as well as the impact of mediator variables such as culture, gender and team structure. Establishing a valid and reliable assessment instrument of group identity will vastly improve insight into group dynamics.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=41149105887&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=41149105887&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Conference contribution

AN - SCOPUS:41149105887

SN - 9781605600390

VL - 1

SP - 1

EP - 13

BT - AIAA 57th International Astronautical Congress, IAC 2006

ER -