Assessing the need for and acceptability of a free-of-charge postpartum HPV vaccination program

Abbey Berenson, Eneida Male, Toy Lee, Alan Barrett, Kwabena O. Sarpong, Richard Rupp, Mahbubur Rahman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine uptake rate among young adult US women was only 23% in 2010. One way to improve this low rate is to administer the vaccine postpartum. We examined whether this population requires vaccination and whether they would be agreeable to receiving it free of charge after delivery. Study Design Women 26 years of age or younger seeking prenatal care in publicly funded clinics in southeast Texas were interviewed in 2012 regarding their HPV vaccination status, barriers to vaccination, and whether they would be willing to receive this vaccine postpartum if offered free of charge. Medical charts were reviewed to extract additional information. Results Overall, 13.0% (65 of 500) stated they had initiated and 7.6% (38 of 500) completed the 3-dose vaccine series. Ethnic differences were noted with 21.0% of non-Hispanic whites, 14.6% of blacks, and 9.3% of Hispanics (P =.002) initiating the vaccine and 13.5%, 7.8%, and 5.2% (P =.006) competing all 3 doses, respectively. Lowest initiation (4.2%) and completion (1.4%) rates were observed among recently immigrated Hispanic women. Those who had not graduated from high school and older women were less likely to have been vaccinated. Almost 83% of those who had not received any HPV doses or completed the series were willing to receive the injection free of charge in the hospital after their delivery. Conclusion HPV vaccine uptake rates are very low among women receiving prenatal care in southeast Texas. Offering this vaccine free of charge to postpartum women could be an effective strategy in this population because 5 of 6 women favored receiving it in this setting.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Volume210
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2014

Fingerprint

Postpartum Period
Vaccination
Vaccines
Papillomavirus Vaccines
Prenatal Care
Hispanic Americans
Hospital Charges
Population
Young Adult
Injections

Keywords

  • correlates
  • HPV
  • human papillomavirus
  • postpartum
  • race/ethnicity
  • vaccine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Assessing the need for and acceptability of a free-of-charge postpartum HPV vaccination program. / Berenson, Abbey; Male, Eneida; Lee, Toy; Barrett, Alan; Sarpong, Kwabena O.; Rupp, Richard; Rahman, Mahbubur.

In: American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Vol. 210, No. 3, 03.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{2e4c8f315f8a42b2a31fde3c55284553,
title = "Assessing the need for and acceptability of a free-of-charge postpartum HPV vaccination program",
abstract = "Objective Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine uptake rate among young adult US women was only 23{\%} in 2010. One way to improve this low rate is to administer the vaccine postpartum. We examined whether this population requires vaccination and whether they would be agreeable to receiving it free of charge after delivery. Study Design Women 26 years of age or younger seeking prenatal care in publicly funded clinics in southeast Texas were interviewed in 2012 regarding their HPV vaccination status, barriers to vaccination, and whether they would be willing to receive this vaccine postpartum if offered free of charge. Medical charts were reviewed to extract additional information. Results Overall, 13.0{\%} (65 of 500) stated they had initiated and 7.6{\%} (38 of 500) completed the 3-dose vaccine series. Ethnic differences were noted with 21.0{\%} of non-Hispanic whites, 14.6{\%} of blacks, and 9.3{\%} of Hispanics (P =.002) initiating the vaccine and 13.5{\%}, 7.8{\%}, and 5.2{\%} (P =.006) competing all 3 doses, respectively. Lowest initiation (4.2{\%}) and completion (1.4{\%}) rates were observed among recently immigrated Hispanic women. Those who had not graduated from high school and older women were less likely to have been vaccinated. Almost 83{\%} of those who had not received any HPV doses or completed the series were willing to receive the injection free of charge in the hospital after their delivery. Conclusion HPV vaccine uptake rates are very low among women receiving prenatal care in southeast Texas. Offering this vaccine free of charge to postpartum women could be an effective strategy in this population because 5 of 6 women favored receiving it in this setting.",
keywords = "correlates, HPV, human papillomavirus, postpartum, race/ethnicity, vaccine",
author = "Abbey Berenson and Eneida Male and Toy Lee and Alan Barrett and Sarpong, {Kwabena O.} and Richard Rupp and Mahbubur Rahman",
year = "2014",
month = "3",
doi = "10.1016/j.ajog.2013.11.036",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "210",
journal = "American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology",
issn = "0002-9378",
publisher = "Mosby Inc.",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Assessing the need for and acceptability of a free-of-charge postpartum HPV vaccination program

AU - Berenson, Abbey

AU - Male, Eneida

AU - Lee, Toy

AU - Barrett, Alan

AU - Sarpong, Kwabena O.

AU - Rupp, Richard

AU - Rahman, Mahbubur

PY - 2014/3

Y1 - 2014/3

N2 - Objective Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine uptake rate among young adult US women was only 23% in 2010. One way to improve this low rate is to administer the vaccine postpartum. We examined whether this population requires vaccination and whether they would be agreeable to receiving it free of charge after delivery. Study Design Women 26 years of age or younger seeking prenatal care in publicly funded clinics in southeast Texas were interviewed in 2012 regarding their HPV vaccination status, barriers to vaccination, and whether they would be willing to receive this vaccine postpartum if offered free of charge. Medical charts were reviewed to extract additional information. Results Overall, 13.0% (65 of 500) stated they had initiated and 7.6% (38 of 500) completed the 3-dose vaccine series. Ethnic differences were noted with 21.0% of non-Hispanic whites, 14.6% of blacks, and 9.3% of Hispanics (P =.002) initiating the vaccine and 13.5%, 7.8%, and 5.2% (P =.006) competing all 3 doses, respectively. Lowest initiation (4.2%) and completion (1.4%) rates were observed among recently immigrated Hispanic women. Those who had not graduated from high school and older women were less likely to have been vaccinated. Almost 83% of those who had not received any HPV doses or completed the series were willing to receive the injection free of charge in the hospital after their delivery. Conclusion HPV vaccine uptake rates are very low among women receiving prenatal care in southeast Texas. Offering this vaccine free of charge to postpartum women could be an effective strategy in this population because 5 of 6 women favored receiving it in this setting.

AB - Objective Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine uptake rate among young adult US women was only 23% in 2010. One way to improve this low rate is to administer the vaccine postpartum. We examined whether this population requires vaccination and whether they would be agreeable to receiving it free of charge after delivery. Study Design Women 26 years of age or younger seeking prenatal care in publicly funded clinics in southeast Texas were interviewed in 2012 regarding their HPV vaccination status, barriers to vaccination, and whether they would be willing to receive this vaccine postpartum if offered free of charge. Medical charts were reviewed to extract additional information. Results Overall, 13.0% (65 of 500) stated they had initiated and 7.6% (38 of 500) completed the 3-dose vaccine series. Ethnic differences were noted with 21.0% of non-Hispanic whites, 14.6% of blacks, and 9.3% of Hispanics (P =.002) initiating the vaccine and 13.5%, 7.8%, and 5.2% (P =.006) competing all 3 doses, respectively. Lowest initiation (4.2%) and completion (1.4%) rates were observed among recently immigrated Hispanic women. Those who had not graduated from high school and older women were less likely to have been vaccinated. Almost 83% of those who had not received any HPV doses or completed the series were willing to receive the injection free of charge in the hospital after their delivery. Conclusion HPV vaccine uptake rates are very low among women receiving prenatal care in southeast Texas. Offering this vaccine free of charge to postpartum women could be an effective strategy in this population because 5 of 6 women favored receiving it in this setting.

KW - correlates

KW - HPV

KW - human papillomavirus

KW - postpartum

KW - race/ethnicity

KW - vaccine

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84894597261&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84894597261&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.ajog.2013.11.036

DO - 10.1016/j.ajog.2013.11.036

M3 - Article

VL - 210

JO - American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology

JF - American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology

SN - 0002-9378

IS - 3

ER -