Association between gestational weight gain and risk of obesity in preadolescence: A longitudinal study (1997-2007) of 5125 children in Greece

S. P. Mourtakos, K. D. Tambalis, D. B. Panagiotakos, G. Antonogeorgos, C. D. Alexi, M. Georgoulis, George Saade, L. S. Sidossis

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    7 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Background: The present study aimed to investigate the association between gestational weight gain (GWG) and birth weight, as well as the body mass index (BMI) status, of children at the ages of 2 and 8 years. Methods: Population-based data were obtained from a database of all 7-9-year-old Greek children who attended primary school during 1997-2007. The study sample consisted of 5125 children matched with their mothers, randomly selected according to region and place of residence, and equally distributed (approximately 500 per year) throughout the study period (1997-2007). A standardised questionnaire was applied; telephone interviews were carried out to collect maternal age, BMI status at the beginning and the end of pregnancy and GWG, birth weight of offspring and BMI status at the ages of 2 and 8 years, as well as several other pregnancy characteristics (e.g. pregnancy duration, gestational medical problems, maternal smoking and alcohol consumption habits, and lactation of offspring after pregnancy). Results: Gestational weight gain was positively associated with the weight status of offspring at all three life stages studied: newborn (birth weight), infant (BMI) and child (BMI) [b = 0.008 (0.001), b = 0.053 (0.009) and b = 0.034 (0.007), respectively, all P < 0.001], after adjusting for maternal age at pregnancy (significant inverse predictor only at age 2 years). The same applied to excessive GWG, as defined by the Institute of Medicine guidelines. Conclusions: Excessive GWG was associated with a higher risk of greater infant size at birth and a higher BMI status at the ages of 2 and 8 years. Healthcare providers should encourage women to limit their GWG to the range indicated by the current guidelines. Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    JournalJournal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics
    DOIs
    StateAccepted/In press - 2016

    Fingerprint

    Greece
    Weight Gain
    Longitudinal Studies
    Body Mass Index
    Obesity
    Pregnancy
    Birth Weight
    Maternal Age
    Mothers
    Guidelines
    National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine (U.S.) Health and Medicine Division
    Dietetics
    Lactation
    Alcohol Drinking
    Health Personnel
    Habits
    Smoking
    Parturition
    Newborn Infant
    Databases

    Keywords

    • Child
    • Childhood obesity
    • Infant
    • IOM category
    • Maternal weight gain
    • Newborn
    • Preadolescence
    • Pregnancy

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Medicine (miscellaneous)
    • Nutrition and Dietetics

    Cite this

    Mourtakos, S. P., Tambalis, K. D., Panagiotakos, D. B., Antonogeorgos, G., Alexi, C. D., Georgoulis, M., ... Sidossis, L. S. (Accepted/In press). Association between gestational weight gain and risk of obesity in preadolescence: A longitudinal study (1997-2007) of 5125 children in Greece. Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics. https://doi.org/10.1111/jhn.12398

    Association between gestational weight gain and risk of obesity in preadolescence : A longitudinal study (1997-2007) of 5125 children in Greece. / Mourtakos, S. P.; Tambalis, K. D.; Panagiotakos, D. B.; Antonogeorgos, G.; Alexi, C. D.; Georgoulis, M.; Saade, George; Sidossis, L. S.

    In: Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics, 2016.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Mourtakos, S. P. ; Tambalis, K. D. ; Panagiotakos, D. B. ; Antonogeorgos, G. ; Alexi, C. D. ; Georgoulis, M. ; Saade, George ; Sidossis, L. S. / Association between gestational weight gain and risk of obesity in preadolescence : A longitudinal study (1997-2007) of 5125 children in Greece. In: Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics. 2016.
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    abstract = "Background: The present study aimed to investigate the association between gestational weight gain (GWG) and birth weight, as well as the body mass index (BMI) status, of children at the ages of 2 and 8 years. Methods: Population-based data were obtained from a database of all 7-9-year-old Greek children who attended primary school during 1997-2007. The study sample consisted of 5125 children matched with their mothers, randomly selected according to region and place of residence, and equally distributed (approximately 500 per year) throughout the study period (1997-2007). A standardised questionnaire was applied; telephone interviews were carried out to collect maternal age, BMI status at the beginning and the end of pregnancy and GWG, birth weight of offspring and BMI status at the ages of 2 and 8 years, as well as several other pregnancy characteristics (e.g. pregnancy duration, gestational medical problems, maternal smoking and alcohol consumption habits, and lactation of offspring after pregnancy). Results: Gestational weight gain was positively associated with the weight status of offspring at all three life stages studied: newborn (birth weight), infant (BMI) and child (BMI) [b = 0.008 (0.001), b = 0.053 (0.009) and b = 0.034 (0.007), respectively, all P < 0.001], after adjusting for maternal age at pregnancy (significant inverse predictor only at age 2 years). The same applied to excessive GWG, as defined by the Institute of Medicine guidelines. Conclusions: Excessive GWG was associated with a higher risk of greater infant size at birth and a higher BMI status at the ages of 2 and 8 years. Healthcare providers should encourage women to limit their GWG to the range indicated by the current guidelines. Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics",
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    author = "Mourtakos, {S. P.} and Tambalis, {K. D.} and Panagiotakos, {D. B.} and G. Antonogeorgos and Alexi, {C. D.} and M. Georgoulis and George Saade and Sidossis, {L. S.}",
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    T1 - Association between gestational weight gain and risk of obesity in preadolescence

    T2 - A longitudinal study (1997-2007) of 5125 children in Greece

    AU - Mourtakos, S. P.

    AU - Tambalis, K. D.

    AU - Panagiotakos, D. B.

    AU - Antonogeorgos, G.

    AU - Alexi, C. D.

    AU - Georgoulis, M.

    AU - Saade, George

    AU - Sidossis, L. S.

    PY - 2016

    Y1 - 2016

    N2 - Background: The present study aimed to investigate the association between gestational weight gain (GWG) and birth weight, as well as the body mass index (BMI) status, of children at the ages of 2 and 8 years. Methods: Population-based data were obtained from a database of all 7-9-year-old Greek children who attended primary school during 1997-2007. The study sample consisted of 5125 children matched with their mothers, randomly selected according to region and place of residence, and equally distributed (approximately 500 per year) throughout the study period (1997-2007). A standardised questionnaire was applied; telephone interviews were carried out to collect maternal age, BMI status at the beginning and the end of pregnancy and GWG, birth weight of offspring and BMI status at the ages of 2 and 8 years, as well as several other pregnancy characteristics (e.g. pregnancy duration, gestational medical problems, maternal smoking and alcohol consumption habits, and lactation of offspring after pregnancy). Results: Gestational weight gain was positively associated with the weight status of offspring at all three life stages studied: newborn (birth weight), infant (BMI) and child (BMI) [b = 0.008 (0.001), b = 0.053 (0.009) and b = 0.034 (0.007), respectively, all P < 0.001], after adjusting for maternal age at pregnancy (significant inverse predictor only at age 2 years). The same applied to excessive GWG, as defined by the Institute of Medicine guidelines. Conclusions: Excessive GWG was associated with a higher risk of greater infant size at birth and a higher BMI status at the ages of 2 and 8 years. Healthcare providers should encourage women to limit their GWG to the range indicated by the current guidelines. Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics

    AB - Background: The present study aimed to investigate the association between gestational weight gain (GWG) and birth weight, as well as the body mass index (BMI) status, of children at the ages of 2 and 8 years. Methods: Population-based data were obtained from a database of all 7-9-year-old Greek children who attended primary school during 1997-2007. The study sample consisted of 5125 children matched with their mothers, randomly selected according to region and place of residence, and equally distributed (approximately 500 per year) throughout the study period (1997-2007). A standardised questionnaire was applied; telephone interviews were carried out to collect maternal age, BMI status at the beginning and the end of pregnancy and GWG, birth weight of offspring and BMI status at the ages of 2 and 8 years, as well as several other pregnancy characteristics (e.g. pregnancy duration, gestational medical problems, maternal smoking and alcohol consumption habits, and lactation of offspring after pregnancy). Results: Gestational weight gain was positively associated with the weight status of offspring at all three life stages studied: newborn (birth weight), infant (BMI) and child (BMI) [b = 0.008 (0.001), b = 0.053 (0.009) and b = 0.034 (0.007), respectively, all P < 0.001], after adjusting for maternal age at pregnancy (significant inverse predictor only at age 2 years). The same applied to excessive GWG, as defined by the Institute of Medicine guidelines. Conclusions: Excessive GWG was associated with a higher risk of greater infant size at birth and a higher BMI status at the ages of 2 and 8 years. Healthcare providers should encourage women to limit their GWG to the range indicated by the current guidelines. Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics

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    KW - Childhood obesity

    KW - Infant

    KW - IOM category

    KW - Maternal weight gain

    KW - Newborn

    KW - Preadolescence

    KW - Pregnancy

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