Association between intraoperative low blood pressure and development of surgical site infection after colorectal surgery

A retrospective cohort study

Rovnat Babazade, Huseyin O. Yilmaz, Nicole M. Zimmerman, Luca Stocchi, Emre Gorgun, Hermann Kessler, Daniel I. Sessler, Andrea Kurz, Alparslan Turan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: We tested the primary hypothesis that surgical site infections (SSIs) are more common in patients who had longer periods of intraoperative low blood pressure. Our secondary hypothesis was that hospitalization is prolonged in patients experiencing longer periods of critically low systolic blood pressure (SBP) and/or mean arterial pressure (MAP). Background: Hypotension compromises local tissue perfusion, thereby reducing tissue oxygenation. Hypotension might thus be expected to promote infection, but the extent to which low blood pressure contributes remains unclear. Methods: We considered patients who had colorectal surgery lasting at least 1 hour at the Cleveland Clinic between 2009 and 2013. The duration of hypotensive exposure and development of SSI was assessed with logistic regression; the association between hypotensive exposure and duration of hospitalization was assessed with Cox proportional hazard regression. Results: A total of 2521 patients were eligible for analysis. There was no adjusted association between SBP hypotension <80mm Hg and SSI, with an estimated odds ratio (95% confidence interval) of 0.97 (0.81, 1.17) per 5- minute increase in SBP hypotension (P = 0.54). There was also no adjusted association between MAP hypotension time and SSI, with estimated odds ratio of 0.97 (0.81, 1.17) for a 5-minute increase in MAP hypotension <55mm Hg time (P = 0.71). There was no association between duration of hypotension and time to discharge. Conclusions: Intraoperative hypotension does not seem to be a clinically important predictor of SSI after colorectal surgery, probably because the outcomes are overwhelmingly determined by other baseline and surgical factors-and perhaps postoperative hypotension.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1058-1064
Number of pages7
JournalAnnals of Surgery
Volume264
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 28 2016
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Surgical Wound Infection
Colorectal Surgery
Hypotension
Cohort Studies
Retrospective Studies
Blood Pressure
Arterial Pressure
Hospitalization
Intraoperative Period
Odds Ratio

Keywords

  • Anesthesia
  • Colorectal surgery
  • Intraoperative hypotension
  • Surgical site infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Association between intraoperative low blood pressure and development of surgical site infection after colorectal surgery : A retrospective cohort study. / Babazade, Rovnat; Yilmaz, Huseyin O.; Zimmerman, Nicole M.; Stocchi, Luca; Gorgun, Emre; Kessler, Hermann; Sessler, Daniel I.; Kurz, Andrea; Turan, Alparslan.

In: Annals of Surgery, Vol. 264, No. 6, 28.11.2016, p. 1058-1064.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Babazade, Rovnat ; Yilmaz, Huseyin O. ; Zimmerman, Nicole M. ; Stocchi, Luca ; Gorgun, Emre ; Kessler, Hermann ; Sessler, Daniel I. ; Kurz, Andrea ; Turan, Alparslan. / Association between intraoperative low blood pressure and development of surgical site infection after colorectal surgery : A retrospective cohort study. In: Annals of Surgery. 2016 ; Vol. 264, No. 6. pp. 1058-1064.
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T2 - A retrospective cohort study

AU - Babazade, Rovnat

AU - Yilmaz, Huseyin O.

AU - Zimmerman, Nicole M.

AU - Stocchi, Luca

AU - Gorgun, Emre

AU - Kessler, Hermann

AU - Sessler, Daniel I.

AU - Kurz, Andrea

AU - Turan, Alparslan

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N2 - Objective: We tested the primary hypothesis that surgical site infections (SSIs) are more common in patients who had longer periods of intraoperative low blood pressure. Our secondary hypothesis was that hospitalization is prolonged in patients experiencing longer periods of critically low systolic blood pressure (SBP) and/or mean arterial pressure (MAP). Background: Hypotension compromises local tissue perfusion, thereby reducing tissue oxygenation. Hypotension might thus be expected to promote infection, but the extent to which low blood pressure contributes remains unclear. Methods: We considered patients who had colorectal surgery lasting at least 1 hour at the Cleveland Clinic between 2009 and 2013. The duration of hypotensive exposure and development of SSI was assessed with logistic regression; the association between hypotensive exposure and duration of hospitalization was assessed with Cox proportional hazard regression. Results: A total of 2521 patients were eligible for analysis. There was no adjusted association between SBP hypotension <80mm Hg and SSI, with an estimated odds ratio (95% confidence interval) of 0.97 (0.81, 1.17) per 5- minute increase in SBP hypotension (P = 0.54). There was also no adjusted association between MAP hypotension time and SSI, with estimated odds ratio of 0.97 (0.81, 1.17) for a 5-minute increase in MAP hypotension <55mm Hg time (P = 0.71). There was no association between duration of hypotension and time to discharge. Conclusions: Intraoperative hypotension does not seem to be a clinically important predictor of SSI after colorectal surgery, probably because the outcomes are overwhelmingly determined by other baseline and surgical factors-and perhaps postoperative hypotension.

AB - Objective: We tested the primary hypothesis that surgical site infections (SSIs) are more common in patients who had longer periods of intraoperative low blood pressure. Our secondary hypothesis was that hospitalization is prolonged in patients experiencing longer periods of critically low systolic blood pressure (SBP) and/or mean arterial pressure (MAP). Background: Hypotension compromises local tissue perfusion, thereby reducing tissue oxygenation. Hypotension might thus be expected to promote infection, but the extent to which low blood pressure contributes remains unclear. Methods: We considered patients who had colorectal surgery lasting at least 1 hour at the Cleveland Clinic between 2009 and 2013. The duration of hypotensive exposure and development of SSI was assessed with logistic regression; the association between hypotensive exposure and duration of hospitalization was assessed with Cox proportional hazard regression. Results: A total of 2521 patients were eligible for analysis. There was no adjusted association between SBP hypotension <80mm Hg and SSI, with an estimated odds ratio (95% confidence interval) of 0.97 (0.81, 1.17) per 5- minute increase in SBP hypotension (P = 0.54). There was also no adjusted association between MAP hypotension time and SSI, with estimated odds ratio of 0.97 (0.81, 1.17) for a 5-minute increase in MAP hypotension <55mm Hg time (P = 0.71). There was no association between duration of hypotension and time to discharge. Conclusions: Intraoperative hypotension does not seem to be a clinically important predictor of SSI after colorectal surgery, probably because the outcomes are overwhelmingly determined by other baseline and surgical factors-and perhaps postoperative hypotension.

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KW - Surgical site infection

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