Association of postburn fatty acids and triglycerides with clinical outcome in severely burned children

Robert Kraft, David Herndon, Celeste Finnerty, Yaeko Hiyama, Marc G. Jeschke

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Context: Free fatty acids (FFAs) and triglycerides (TGs) are altered postburn, but whether these alterations are associated with postburn outcomes is not clear. Objective: The aim of the present study was to analyze lipid metabolic profiles in pediatric burn patients and to correlate these profiles with patient outcomes and hospital courses. Design and Setting: We conducted a prospective cohort study at an academic pediatric hospital burn center. Patients: Our study included 219 pediatric burn patients. Main Outcome Measures: Patients were stratified according to their plasma TG and FFA levels. Main patient outcomes, such as postburn morbidity and mortality, and clinical metabolic markers were analyzed. Results: All groups were similar in demographics and injury characteristics. Patients with elevated TGs had significantly worse clinical outcomes associated with increased acute-phase protein synthesis indicating augmented inflammation and hypermetabolism, whereas increased FFAs did not seem to profoundly alter postburn outcomes. Conclusions: Elevated TGs, but not FFAs, postburn are associated with worsened organ function and clinical outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)314-321
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism
Volume98
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2013

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Nonesterified Fatty Acids
Pediatrics
Triglycerides
Fatty Acids
Acute-Phase Proteins
Burn Units
Pediatric Hospitals
Metabolome
Lipids
Plasmas
Cohort Studies
Biomarkers
Demography
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Prospective Studies
Inflammation
Morbidity
Mortality
Wounds and Injuries

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Endocrinology
  • Biochemistry, medical
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Association of postburn fatty acids and triglycerides with clinical outcome in severely burned children. / Kraft, Robert; Herndon, David; Finnerty, Celeste; Hiyama, Yaeko; Jeschke, Marc G.

In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, Vol. 98, No. 1, 01.2013, p. 314-321.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AB - Context: Free fatty acids (FFAs) and triglycerides (TGs) are altered postburn, but whether these alterations are associated with postburn outcomes is not clear. Objective: The aim of the present study was to analyze lipid metabolic profiles in pediatric burn patients and to correlate these profiles with patient outcomes and hospital courses. Design and Setting: We conducted a prospective cohort study at an academic pediatric hospital burn center. Patients: Our study included 219 pediatric burn patients. Main Outcome Measures: Patients were stratified according to their plasma TG and FFA levels. Main patient outcomes, such as postburn morbidity and mortality, and clinical metabolic markers were analyzed. Results: All groups were similar in demographics and injury characteristics. Patients with elevated TGs had significantly worse clinical outcomes associated with increased acute-phase protein synthesis indicating augmented inflammation and hypermetabolism, whereas increased FFAs did not seem to profoundly alter postburn outcomes. Conclusions: Elevated TGs, but not FFAs, postburn are associated with worsened organ function and clinical outcomes.

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