Association of smoked and smokeless tobacco use with migraine: A hospital-based case-control study in Dhaka, Bangladesh

Mohammad Abul Bashar Sarker, Mahbubur Rahman, Md Harun-Or-Rashid, Shaila Hossain, Hideki Kasuya, Junichi Sakamoto, Nobuyuki Hamajima

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    9 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Background: Several studies in the past have reported inconclusive evidences on association of smoking and migraine. Nevertheless, no study so far reported association of smokeless tobacco with migraine. The objective of this study was to examine the association of smoked and smokeless tobacco use with migraine. Methods. A hospital-based case-control study was conducted at the neurology outpatient department of a tertiary care hospital in Dhaka, Bangladesh. We enrolled 138 migraine cases diagnosed during March-September 2010 in neurology outpatient department, and 276 gender and age matched healthy controls from among their attendants. Diagnosis of migraine was based on the International Headache Society criteria. Use of smokeless tobacco and smoking (cigarette/bidi/hukka) were determined by an interviewer administered questionnaire. Results: Among the cases, 52.9% were overall tobacco users; 24.6% were only smokers, 15.9% only smokeless tobacco users and 12.3% used both. The respective figures among controls were 14.5%, 7.2%, 6.9% and 0.4% (P <0.001 for all). The conditional logistic regression analysis found that migraine had higher odds of exposure to smoked tobacco use, smokeless tobacco use, and both compared to control after adjusting for confounding variables (alcohol drinking, insufficient sleep, mental stress, and number of family members); adjusted odds ratio (aOR) was 6.6 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.2-19.6, P = 0.001), 5.8 (95%CI = 1.9-17.4, P = 0.001), and 54.2 (95%CI = 4.3-684.4, P = 0.002), respectively. The aOR of cigarette/bidi/hukka smoking for different doses was 5.5 (95%CI = 1.2-24.8, P = 0.027) for 1-5 times per day, 6.3 (95%CI = 1.8-21.2, P = 0.003) for 6-10 times per day, and 6.7 (95%CI = 1.9-23.2, P = 0.003) for >10 times per day relative to non users. Conclusions: Both smoked and smokeless tobaccos were found to be associated with migraine. There is a need to incorporate smokeless tobacco along with smoked tobacco into the anti-tobacco awareness programs to reduce the burden of migraine in Bangladesh.

    Original languageEnglish (US)
    Article number15
    JournalTobacco Induced Diseases
    Volume11
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    StatePublished - 2013

    Fingerprint

    Smokeless Tobacco
    Bangladesh
    Tobacco Use
    Migraine Disorders
    nicotine
    Case-Control Studies
    Tobacco
    Neurology
    neurology
    Outpatients
    Smoking
    smoking
    Tertiary Healthcare
    Tertiary Care Centers
    Tobacco Products
    Headache
    Interviews

    Keywords

    • Bangladesh
    • Migraine
    • Smoked tobacco
    • Smokeless tobacco
    • Smoking

    ASJC Scopus subject areas

    • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
    • Health(social science)
    • Medicine (miscellaneous)

    Cite this

    Sarker, M. A. B., Rahman, M., Harun-Or-Rashid, M., Hossain, S., Kasuya, H., Sakamoto, J., & Hamajima, N. (2013). Association of smoked and smokeless tobacco use with migraine: A hospital-based case-control study in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Tobacco Induced Diseases, 11(1), [15]. https://doi.org/10.1186/1617-9625-11-15

    Association of smoked and smokeless tobacco use with migraine : A hospital-based case-control study in Dhaka, Bangladesh. / Sarker, Mohammad Abul Bashar; Rahman, Mahbubur; Harun-Or-Rashid, Md; Hossain, Shaila; Kasuya, Hideki; Sakamoto, Junichi; Hamajima, Nobuyuki.

    In: Tobacco Induced Diseases, Vol. 11, No. 1, 15, 2013.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Sarker, MAB, Rahman, M, Harun-Or-Rashid, M, Hossain, S, Kasuya, H, Sakamoto, J & Hamajima, N 2013, 'Association of smoked and smokeless tobacco use with migraine: A hospital-based case-control study in Dhaka, Bangladesh', Tobacco Induced Diseases, vol. 11, no. 1, 15. https://doi.org/10.1186/1617-9625-11-15
    Sarker, Mohammad Abul Bashar ; Rahman, Mahbubur ; Harun-Or-Rashid, Md ; Hossain, Shaila ; Kasuya, Hideki ; Sakamoto, Junichi ; Hamajima, Nobuyuki. / Association of smoked and smokeless tobacco use with migraine : A hospital-based case-control study in Dhaka, Bangladesh. In: Tobacco Induced Diseases. 2013 ; Vol. 11, No. 1.
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    abstract = "Background: Several studies in the past have reported inconclusive evidences on association of smoking and migraine. Nevertheless, no study so far reported association of smokeless tobacco with migraine. The objective of this study was to examine the association of smoked and smokeless tobacco use with migraine. Methods. A hospital-based case-control study was conducted at the neurology outpatient department of a tertiary care hospital in Dhaka, Bangladesh. We enrolled 138 migraine cases diagnosed during March-September 2010 in neurology outpatient department, and 276 gender and age matched healthy controls from among their attendants. Diagnosis of migraine was based on the International Headache Society criteria. Use of smokeless tobacco and smoking (cigarette/bidi/hukka) were determined by an interviewer administered questionnaire. Results: Among the cases, 52.9{\%} were overall tobacco users; 24.6{\%} were only smokers, 15.9{\%} only smokeless tobacco users and 12.3{\%} used both. The respective figures among controls were 14.5{\%}, 7.2{\%}, 6.9{\%} and 0.4{\%} (P <0.001 for all). The conditional logistic regression analysis found that migraine had higher odds of exposure to smoked tobacco use, smokeless tobacco use, and both compared to control after adjusting for confounding variables (alcohol drinking, insufficient sleep, mental stress, and number of family members); adjusted odds ratio (aOR) was 6.6 (95{\%} confidence interval [CI] = 2.2-19.6, P = 0.001), 5.8 (95{\%}CI = 1.9-17.4, P = 0.001), and 54.2 (95{\%}CI = 4.3-684.4, P = 0.002), respectively. The aOR of cigarette/bidi/hukka smoking for different doses was 5.5 (95{\%}CI = 1.2-24.8, P = 0.027) for 1-5 times per day, 6.3 (95{\%}CI = 1.8-21.2, P = 0.003) for 6-10 times per day, and 6.7 (95{\%}CI = 1.9-23.2, P = 0.003) for >10 times per day relative to non users. Conclusions: Both smoked and smokeless tobaccos were found to be associated with migraine. There is a need to incorporate smokeless tobacco along with smoked tobacco into the anti-tobacco awareness programs to reduce the burden of migraine in Bangladesh.",
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    T1 - Association of smoked and smokeless tobacco use with migraine

    T2 - A hospital-based case-control study in Dhaka, Bangladesh

    AU - Sarker, Mohammad Abul Bashar

    AU - Rahman, Mahbubur

    AU - Harun-Or-Rashid, Md

    AU - Hossain, Shaila

    AU - Kasuya, Hideki

    AU - Sakamoto, Junichi

    AU - Hamajima, Nobuyuki

    PY - 2013

    Y1 - 2013

    N2 - Background: Several studies in the past have reported inconclusive evidences on association of smoking and migraine. Nevertheless, no study so far reported association of smokeless tobacco with migraine. The objective of this study was to examine the association of smoked and smokeless tobacco use with migraine. Methods. A hospital-based case-control study was conducted at the neurology outpatient department of a tertiary care hospital in Dhaka, Bangladesh. We enrolled 138 migraine cases diagnosed during March-September 2010 in neurology outpatient department, and 276 gender and age matched healthy controls from among their attendants. Diagnosis of migraine was based on the International Headache Society criteria. Use of smokeless tobacco and smoking (cigarette/bidi/hukka) were determined by an interviewer administered questionnaire. Results: Among the cases, 52.9% were overall tobacco users; 24.6% were only smokers, 15.9% only smokeless tobacco users and 12.3% used both. The respective figures among controls were 14.5%, 7.2%, 6.9% and 0.4% (P <0.001 for all). The conditional logistic regression analysis found that migraine had higher odds of exposure to smoked tobacco use, smokeless tobacco use, and both compared to control after adjusting for confounding variables (alcohol drinking, insufficient sleep, mental stress, and number of family members); adjusted odds ratio (aOR) was 6.6 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.2-19.6, P = 0.001), 5.8 (95%CI = 1.9-17.4, P = 0.001), and 54.2 (95%CI = 4.3-684.4, P = 0.002), respectively. The aOR of cigarette/bidi/hukka smoking for different doses was 5.5 (95%CI = 1.2-24.8, P = 0.027) for 1-5 times per day, 6.3 (95%CI = 1.8-21.2, P = 0.003) for 6-10 times per day, and 6.7 (95%CI = 1.9-23.2, P = 0.003) for >10 times per day relative to non users. Conclusions: Both smoked and smokeless tobaccos were found to be associated with migraine. There is a need to incorporate smokeless tobacco along with smoked tobacco into the anti-tobacco awareness programs to reduce the burden of migraine in Bangladesh.

    AB - Background: Several studies in the past have reported inconclusive evidences on association of smoking and migraine. Nevertheless, no study so far reported association of smokeless tobacco with migraine. The objective of this study was to examine the association of smoked and smokeless tobacco use with migraine. Methods. A hospital-based case-control study was conducted at the neurology outpatient department of a tertiary care hospital in Dhaka, Bangladesh. We enrolled 138 migraine cases diagnosed during March-September 2010 in neurology outpatient department, and 276 gender and age matched healthy controls from among their attendants. Diagnosis of migraine was based on the International Headache Society criteria. Use of smokeless tobacco and smoking (cigarette/bidi/hukka) were determined by an interviewer administered questionnaire. Results: Among the cases, 52.9% were overall tobacco users; 24.6% were only smokers, 15.9% only smokeless tobacco users and 12.3% used both. The respective figures among controls were 14.5%, 7.2%, 6.9% and 0.4% (P <0.001 for all). The conditional logistic regression analysis found that migraine had higher odds of exposure to smoked tobacco use, smokeless tobacco use, and both compared to control after adjusting for confounding variables (alcohol drinking, insufficient sleep, mental stress, and number of family members); adjusted odds ratio (aOR) was 6.6 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.2-19.6, P = 0.001), 5.8 (95%CI = 1.9-17.4, P = 0.001), and 54.2 (95%CI = 4.3-684.4, P = 0.002), respectively. The aOR of cigarette/bidi/hukka smoking for different doses was 5.5 (95%CI = 1.2-24.8, P = 0.027) for 1-5 times per day, 6.3 (95%CI = 1.8-21.2, P = 0.003) for 6-10 times per day, and 6.7 (95%CI = 1.9-23.2, P = 0.003) for >10 times per day relative to non users. Conclusions: Both smoked and smokeless tobaccos were found to be associated with migraine. There is a need to incorporate smokeless tobacco along with smoked tobacco into the anti-tobacco awareness programs to reduce the burden of migraine in Bangladesh.

    KW - Bangladesh

    KW - Migraine

    KW - Smoked tobacco

    KW - Smokeless tobacco

    KW - Smoking

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