Associations between positive emotion and recovery of functional status following stroke

Glenn V. Ostir, Ivonne Marie Berges, Margaret E. Ottenbacher, Angela Clow, Kenneth Ottenbacher

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

46 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Accumulating evidence indicates the beneficial effects of positive emotion on health and general well-being in older age. Less evidence is available on whether positive emotion supports improvement in functional status after an acute medical event such as stroke. This study examined the association between positive emotion at discharge from inpatient medical rehabilitation and functional status 3 months later in persons with stroke. Methods: A longitudinal study using information from the Stroke Recovery in Underserved Patients database. The study included 823 persons aged 55 years or older with stroke and admitted to an inpatient medical rehabilitation facility. Information was collected during inpatient medical rehabilitation stay and approximately 3 months after discharge. Results: The mean age of the sample was 72.8 years (SD = 9.5), 51.5% were women and 53.8% were married. The sample was mostly non-Hispanic white (79.2%), followed by non-Hispanic black (15.0%) and Hispanic (5.8%). The average length of stay was 20.1 day (SD = 10.1). In multivariate regression analyses, discharge positive emotion score was significantly associated with higher overall functional status (b = 0.70, SE = 0.21, p =.001) as well as with higher motor (b = 0.37, SE = 0.17, p =.003) and cognitive (b = 0.30, SE = 0.05, p =.0001) status at 3-month follow-up after adjustment for relevant risk factors. Conclusions: Our results indicate positive emotion is associated with gains in functional status after stroke. Findings have implications for stroke recovery programs and suggest the need to include measures of positive emotion inpatient assessments.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)404-409
Number of pages6
JournalPsychosomatic Medicine
Volume70
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2008

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Emotions
Stroke
Inpatients
Rehabilitation
Vulnerable Populations
Hispanic Americans
Longitudinal Studies
Length of Stay
Multivariate Analysis
Regression Analysis
Databases
Health

Keywords

  • Cerebrovascular accident
  • Positive affect
  • Recovery of function

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Applied Psychology
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Associations between positive emotion and recovery of functional status following stroke. / Ostir, Glenn V.; Berges, Ivonne Marie; Ottenbacher, Margaret E.; Clow, Angela; Ottenbacher, Kenneth.

In: Psychosomatic Medicine, Vol. 70, No. 4, 05.2008, p. 404-409.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ostir, Glenn V. ; Berges, Ivonne Marie ; Ottenbacher, Margaret E. ; Clow, Angela ; Ottenbacher, Kenneth. / Associations between positive emotion and recovery of functional status following stroke. In: Psychosomatic Medicine. 2008 ; Vol. 70, No. 4. pp. 404-409.
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